Decade-scale changes of soil carbon, nitrogen and exchangeable cations under chaparral and pine

Decade-scale changes of soil carbon, nitrogen and exchangeable cations under chaparral and pine Four large lysimeters on the San Dimas Experimental Forest, each filled with similar parent material and planted with monocultures of native species in 1946, provide a unique opportunity to quantify short-term effects of plant species on soil properties. The four species under which soils were investigated are scrub oak ( Quercus dumosa Nutt.), chamise ( Adenostoma fasciculatum Hook. and Arn.), ceanothus ( Ceanothus crassifolia Torr.), and Coulter pine ( Pinus coulteri B. Don). A mass-balance approach was used to measure changes in C, N, exchangeable base cations, and exchangeable acidity to a depth of 1 m in the mineral soils over a 41-year period. The C content increased in all of the soils, but the greatest change was in the soil under oak (3.7 kg m −3 more than doubling the original amount. Since the source of C in these soils is the photosynthetic fixation of atmospheric CO 2 , the mass of C accumulated reflects the magnitude of the CO 2 sink provided by chapatral soils in their initial stages of formation. The calculated rate of soil C accumulation is as much as 0.09 kg M −3 yr 1̄ The increase in N was highest in the soil under ceanothus (0.12 kg m −3 the only N 2 -fixing species in this study. Exchangeable Ca increased by 25.7 mol m −3 in the soil under oak, while the maximum increase in exchangeable Mg was 5.5 mol m −3 also under oak. Exchangeable Na was leached from all of the soils (a maximum of 2.4 mol m −3 lost from under chamise and ceanothus) and K was slightly depleted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geoderma Elsevier

Decade-scale changes of soil carbon, nitrogen and exchangeable cations under chaparral and pine

Geoderma, Volume 65 (1) – Feb 1, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0016-7061
eISSN
1872-6259
D.O.I.
10.1016/0016-7061(94)00034-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four large lysimeters on the San Dimas Experimental Forest, each filled with similar parent material and planted with monocultures of native species in 1946, provide a unique opportunity to quantify short-term effects of plant species on soil properties. The four species under which soils were investigated are scrub oak ( Quercus dumosa Nutt.), chamise ( Adenostoma fasciculatum Hook. and Arn.), ceanothus ( Ceanothus crassifolia Torr.), and Coulter pine ( Pinus coulteri B. Don). A mass-balance approach was used to measure changes in C, N, exchangeable base cations, and exchangeable acidity to a depth of 1 m in the mineral soils over a 41-year period. The C content increased in all of the soils, but the greatest change was in the soil under oak (3.7 kg m −3 more than doubling the original amount. Since the source of C in these soils is the photosynthetic fixation of atmospheric CO 2 , the mass of C accumulated reflects the magnitude of the CO 2 sink provided by chapatral soils in their initial stages of formation. The calculated rate of soil C accumulation is as much as 0.09 kg M −3 yr 1̄ The increase in N was highest in the soil under ceanothus (0.12 kg m −3 the only N 2 -fixing species in this study. Exchangeable Ca increased by 25.7 mol m −3 in the soil under oak, while the maximum increase in exchangeable Mg was 5.5 mol m −3 also under oak. Exchangeable Na was leached from all of the soils (a maximum of 2.4 mol m −3 lost from under chamise and ceanothus) and K was slightly depleted.

Journal

GeodermaElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 1995

References

  • Bulk density
    Blake, G.R.; Hartge, K.H.
  • Atmospheric deposition processes and their importance as sources of nutrients in a chaparral ecosystem of southern California
    Schlesinger, W.H.; Gray, J.T.; Gilliam, F.S.

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