Crop management effects on soil carbon sequestration on selected farmers’ fields in northeastern Ohio

Crop management effects on soil carbon sequestration on selected farmers’ fields in... Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is the largest among terrestrial pools. The restoration of SOC pool in arable lands represents a potential sink for atmospheric CO 2 . Restorative management of SOC includes using organic manures, adopting legume-based crop rotations, and converting plow till to a conservation till system. A field study was conducted to analyze soil properties on two farms located in Geauga and Stark Counties in northeastern Ohio, USA. Soil bulk density decreased with increase in SOC pool for a wide range of management systems. In comparison with wooded control, agricultural fields had a lower SOC pool in the 0–30 cm depth. In Geauga County, the SOC pool decreased by 34% in alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) grown in a complex rotation with manuring and 51% in unmanured continuous corn ( Zea mays L.). In Stark County, the SOC pool decreased by 32% in a field systematically amended with poultry manure and 40% in the field receiving only chemical fertilizers. In comparison with continuous corn, the rate of SOC sequestration in Geauga County was 379 kg C ha −1 year −1 in no-till corn (2 years) previously in hay (12 years), 760 kg C ha −1 year −1 in a complex crop rotation receiving manure and chemical fertilizers, and 355 kg C ha −1 year −1 without manuring. The rate of SOC sequestration was 392 kg C ha −1 year −1 on manured field in Stark County. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Soil and Tillage Research Elsevier

Crop management effects on soil carbon sequestration on selected farmers’ fields in northeastern Ohio

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0167-1987
DOI
10.1016/j.still.2004.09.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is the largest among terrestrial pools. The restoration of SOC pool in arable lands represents a potential sink for atmospheric CO 2 . Restorative management of SOC includes using organic manures, adopting legume-based crop rotations, and converting plow till to a conservation till system. A field study was conducted to analyze soil properties on two farms located in Geauga and Stark Counties in northeastern Ohio, USA. Soil bulk density decreased with increase in SOC pool for a wide range of management systems. In comparison with wooded control, agricultural fields had a lower SOC pool in the 0–30 cm depth. In Geauga County, the SOC pool decreased by 34% in alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) grown in a complex rotation with manuring and 51% in unmanured continuous corn ( Zea mays L.). In Stark County, the SOC pool decreased by 32% in a field systematically amended with poultry manure and 40% in the field receiving only chemical fertilizers. In comparison with continuous corn, the rate of SOC sequestration in Geauga County was 379 kg C ha −1 year −1 in no-till corn (2 years) previously in hay (12 years), 760 kg C ha −1 year −1 in a complex crop rotation receiving manure and chemical fertilizers, and 355 kg C ha −1 year −1 without manuring. The rate of SOC sequestration was 392 kg C ha −1 year −1 on manured field in Stark County.

Journal

Soil and Tillage ResearchElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2005

References

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