Coupling crop and bio-economic farm modelling to evaluate the revised fertilization regulations in Germany

Coupling crop and bio-economic farm modelling to evaluate the revised fertilization regulations... The German Fertilization Ordinance, implementing mainly the EU Nitrates Directive, was revised in 2017. We couple the bio-economic farm model FarmDyn and the crop system modelling framework SIMPLACE to assess the environmental and economic impact of the revised ordinance. The analysis focuses on specialized pig fattening and arable farms in the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Most dominant farm types are derived from a farm typology based on the German Farm Structure Survey 2016. Following the revised ordinance, a farm type representing pig farms with a high stocking density lowers its emissions from 50 to 38 kg nitrate (NO3−) nitrogen ha−1 and 18 to 8 kg ammonia (NH3) nitrogen ha−1 from manure application. Compliance costs are 2.32 Euro (€) pig−1 and are mainly caused by the need to export manure to meet the stricter nutrient surplus thresholds. A pig farm type with lower stocking density mainly adapts to the compulsory use of low-emission manure application techniques, resulting in almost constant NO3− leaching, a NH3 reduction from manure application of 13 to 9 kg NH3- nitrogen ha−1, and compliance costs of 0.42 € pig−1. The two assessed arable farm types, which start to import manure under the revised ordinance, can lower costs by 109 and 118 € ha−1. However, manure import increases NO3− leaching and NH3 volatilization. Our results show that intensive pig farms realize a high emission reduction and lose a relevant share of their standard gross margin when complying with the revised ordinance. However, farm types with low stocking density, representing a high share of the pig farms in the study area, show little or no changes in costs and emissions. These findings are relevant for efficient enforcement and targeted support measures. Furthermore, the import of manure on arable farms comprises the danger of regional pollution swapping, which policymakers should address by complementary measures. Future research should focus on improving the data base for crop modelling and on scaling-up the farm model to the regional scale to directly link emission changes and environmental targets. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agricultural Systems Elsevier

Coupling crop and bio-economic farm modelling to evaluate the revised fertilization regulations in Germany

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/coupling-crop-and-bio-economic-farm-modelling-to-evaluate-the-revised-lz3ZWqggMx
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0308-521x
DOI
10.1016/j.agsy.2019.102687
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The German Fertilization Ordinance, implementing mainly the EU Nitrates Directive, was revised in 2017. We couple the bio-economic farm model FarmDyn and the crop system modelling framework SIMPLACE to assess the environmental and economic impact of the revised ordinance. The analysis focuses on specialized pig fattening and arable farms in the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Most dominant farm types are derived from a farm typology based on the German Farm Structure Survey 2016. Following the revised ordinance, a farm type representing pig farms with a high stocking density lowers its emissions from 50 to 38 kg nitrate (NO3−) nitrogen ha−1 and 18 to 8 kg ammonia (NH3) nitrogen ha−1 from manure application. Compliance costs are 2.32 Euro (€) pig−1 and are mainly caused by the need to export manure to meet the stricter nutrient surplus thresholds. A pig farm type with lower stocking density mainly adapts to the compulsory use of low-emission manure application techniques, resulting in almost constant NO3− leaching, a NH3 reduction from manure application of 13 to 9 kg NH3- nitrogen ha−1, and compliance costs of 0.42 € pig−1. The two assessed arable farm types, which start to import manure under the revised ordinance, can lower costs by 109 and 118 € ha−1. However, manure import increases NO3− leaching and NH3 volatilization. Our results show that intensive pig farms realize a high emission reduction and lose a relevant share of their standard gross margin when complying with the revised ordinance. However, farm types with low stocking density, representing a high share of the pig farms in the study area, show little or no changes in costs and emissions. These findings are relevant for efficient enforcement and targeted support measures. Furthermore, the import of manure on arable farms comprises the danger of regional pollution swapping, which policymakers should address by complementary measures. Future research should focus on improving the data base for crop modelling and on scaling-up the farm model to the regional scale to directly link emission changes and environmental targets.

Journal

Agricultural SystemsElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2020

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off