Coupling building energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics: Application to a two-storey house in a temperate climate

Coupling building energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics: Application to a two-storey... 1 Introduction</h5> The reduction of a building's energy consumption has become one of the most challenging goals worldwide. This problem is especially challenging in Europe, where 40% of the total energy is dedicated to the heating and cooling of buildings [1] . Therefore, building designers are urged to use new strategies to develop near-zero energy buildings. In fact, European regulations will impose the building of zero-energy buildings as soon as 2020.</P>The scientific community has developed several approaches for building energy simulations (BES) to help building designers, such as multizone dynamic simulations. In parallel, aeronautical studies have led to the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that could be applied to building cases. These approaches aim to optimise building design and retrofitting. Nevertheless, they have a number of limitations and drawbacks.</P>BES is widely used due to its ease and speed. Chen [2] shows that multizone models have been the main tools for predicting ventilation performance in an entire building over the past years. The multizone model allows the prediction of overall flow through the building and the prediction of mean temperature in small rooms, but it cannot predict detailed temperature and airflow distributions within each room. Specifically, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building and Environment Elsevier

Coupling building energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics: Application to a two-storey house in a temperate climate

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1323
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.buildenv.2014.01.012
Publisher site
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Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The reduction of a building's energy consumption has become one of the most challenging goals worldwide. This problem is especially challenging in Europe, where 40% of the total energy is dedicated to the heating and cooling of buildings [1] . Therefore, building designers are urged to use new strategies to develop near-zero energy buildings. In fact, European regulations will impose the building of zero-energy buildings as soon as 2020.</P>The scientific community has developed several approaches for building energy simulations (BES) to help building designers, such as multizone dynamic simulations. In parallel, aeronautical studies have led to the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that could be applied to building cases. These approaches aim to optimise building design and retrofitting. Nevertheless, they have a number of limitations and drawbacks.</P>BES is widely used due to its ease and speed. Chen [2] shows that multizone models have been the main tools for predicting ventilation performance in an entire building over the past years. The multizone model allows the prediction of overall flow through the building and the prediction of mean temperature in small rooms, but it cannot predict detailed temperature and airflow distributions within each room. Specifically, the

Journal

Building and EnvironmentElsevier

Published: May 1, 2014

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