Consumer preferences for organic labels in Germany using the example of apples – Combining choice-based conjoint analysis and eye-tracking measurements

Consumer preferences for organic labels in Germany using the example of apples – Combining... Organic food products are considered as credence goods. Hence, organic labels are important visual stimuli for consumers to determine how a good was produced. Therefore, this study aims to contribute to the literature by examining the visual attention patterns and preferences of consumers in a choice experiment by measuring their eye movements using eye-tracking technology and comparing the results with the findings from choice-based conjoint analysis (CBCA) and other stated preference methods. For this reason, 73 consumers participated in an experiment in 2017 in Germany. The combination of eye-tracking and CBCA can help to overcome some major limitations of choice experiments. For example, low levels of a attribute's part-worth utility can be caused by the participants low preference regarding that attribute or that he/she just haven't viewed the attribute. Our findings indicate that consumers who gain greater utilities from specific attributes of a good also attend to them visually to a greater extent. The study's results also suggest that a combination of stated preference methods with eye-tracking technology has the potential of solving some major limitations of these methods such as social desirability, memory limitations and lack of visual attention to specific product characteristics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cleaner Production Elsevier

Consumer preferences for organic labels in Germany using the example of apples – Combining choice-based conjoint analysis and eye-tracking measurements

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/consumer-preferences-for-organic-labels-in-germany-using-the-example-WOMgRHCTFs
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-6526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.01.235
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Organic food products are considered as credence goods. Hence, organic labels are important visual stimuli for consumers to determine how a good was produced. Therefore, this study aims to contribute to the literature by examining the visual attention patterns and preferences of consumers in a choice experiment by measuring their eye movements using eye-tracking technology and comparing the results with the findings from choice-based conjoint analysis (CBCA) and other stated preference methods. For this reason, 73 consumers participated in an experiment in 2017 in Germany. The combination of eye-tracking and CBCA can help to overcome some major limitations of choice experiments. For example, low levels of a attribute's part-worth utility can be caused by the participants low preference regarding that attribute or that he/she just haven't viewed the attribute. Our findings indicate that consumers who gain greater utilities from specific attributes of a good also attend to them visually to a greater extent. The study's results also suggest that a combination of stated preference methods with eye-tracking technology has the potential of solving some major limitations of these methods such as social desirability, memory limitations and lack of visual attention to specific product characteristics.

Journal

Journal of Cleaner ProductionElsevier

Published: Apr 20, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off