Constrained Geographical Mobility and Gendered Labor Market Outcomes Under Structural Adjustment: Evidence from Egypt

Constrained Geographical Mobility and Gendered Labor Market Outcomes Under Structural Adjustment:... We examine in this paper the evolution of gender gaps in labor market outcomes during structural adjustment and explore the extent to which widening gaps can be attributed to women’s more limited geographical mobility. Using comparable household surveys carried out in 1988 and 1998, we show that gender gaps in access to wage and salary employment and in earnings have widened during this period, especially in the nongovernmental sector. We attribute these changes, at least in part, to women’s more limited geographical mobility. We show that women’s commuting rates are not only much lower than those of men, but also have remained stagnant in a period where males were having to travel significantly more to obtain jobs outside the government. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Development Elsevier

Constrained Geographical Mobility and Gendered Labor Market Outcomes Under Structural Adjustment: Evidence from Egypt

World Development, Volume 33 (3) – Mar 1, 2005

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0305-750X
eISSN
1873-5991
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.worlddev.2004.08.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examine in this paper the evolution of gender gaps in labor market outcomes during structural adjustment and explore the extent to which widening gaps can be attributed to women’s more limited geographical mobility. Using comparable household surveys carried out in 1988 and 1998, we show that gender gaps in access to wage and salary employment and in earnings have widened during this period, especially in the nongovernmental sector. We attribute these changes, at least in part, to women’s more limited geographical mobility. We show that women’s commuting rates are not only much lower than those of men, but also have remained stagnant in a period where males were having to travel significantly more to obtain jobs outside the government.

Journal

World DevelopmentElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2005

References

  • Are married women in Turkey more likely to become added or discouraged workers?
    Baslevent, C.; Onaran, O.
  • The gender dimensions of economic adjustment policies: Potential interactions and evidence to date
    Haddad, L.; Brown, L.R.; Richter, A.; Smith, L.
  • Employment and unemployment in Jordan: The importance of the gender system
    Miles, R.
  • Export-orientation and female share of employment: Evidence from Turkey
    Ozler, S.
  • Global feminization through flexible labor: A theme revisited
    Standing, G.
  • Global feminization through flexible labor
    Standing, G.

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