Concentrations and source characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pine needles from Korea, Mexico, and United States

Concentrations and source characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pine needles... Pine needle samples were collected from Korea, Mexico, and the United States (total 9 sites) to compare the concentrations and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Total PAH concentrations ranged from 31 to 563 ng g −1 (wet wt.) and showed clear differences between rural (clean) and urban/industrialized (contaminated) sites. The lowest and highest concentrations were found in samples from a rural site in Korea and northern part of Mexico City, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns and the ratio of the sum of combustion specific PAHs (∑COMB) to total PAHs (∑PAHs) in samples from Korea and United States were similar, implying similar sources. At these sites, three-ring PAHs accounted for 63–73% of the total PAHs and phenanthrene was the predominant compound. Samples from Mexico City, however, had different PAH patterns and much higher ∑COMB/∑PAHs ratios (0.70 and 0.73). Four-ring PAHs were dominant (∼50%) and pyrene was the most abundant compound. Phenanthrene to anthracene and fluoranthene to pyrene ratios may provide an additional indication of different sources. The ratios of methylphenanthrene to phenanthrene suggest that the contribution of diesel-operated vehicles to the signature of PAHs is more significant in samples from Mexico City than other sites. Enriched high molecular weight PAHs and the ratios of some selected compounds found in Mexico City samples may be the results of more extensive combustion activities and a higher proportion of non-catalyst-equipped vehicles. This study confirms the usefulness of pine needles for source characterization as well as atmospheric organic contaminants monitoring on large spatial scales (e.g., national or global). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Atmospheric Environment Elsevier

Concentrations and source characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pine needles from Korea, Mexico, and United States

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/concentrations-and-source-characterization-of-polycyclic-aromatic-NJ3WRPB1oI
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
1352-2310
eISSN
1873-2844
DOI
10.1016/S1352-2310(03)00090-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pine needle samples were collected from Korea, Mexico, and the United States (total 9 sites) to compare the concentrations and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Total PAH concentrations ranged from 31 to 563 ng g −1 (wet wt.) and showed clear differences between rural (clean) and urban/industrialized (contaminated) sites. The lowest and highest concentrations were found in samples from a rural site in Korea and northern part of Mexico City, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns and the ratio of the sum of combustion specific PAHs (∑COMB) to total PAHs (∑PAHs) in samples from Korea and United States were similar, implying similar sources. At these sites, three-ring PAHs accounted for 63–73% of the total PAHs and phenanthrene was the predominant compound. Samples from Mexico City, however, had different PAH patterns and much higher ∑COMB/∑PAHs ratios (0.70 and 0.73). Four-ring PAHs were dominant (∼50%) and pyrene was the most abundant compound. Phenanthrene to anthracene and fluoranthene to pyrene ratios may provide an additional indication of different sources. The ratios of methylphenanthrene to phenanthrene suggest that the contribution of diesel-operated vehicles to the signature of PAHs is more significant in samples from Mexico City than other sites. Enriched high molecular weight PAHs and the ratios of some selected compounds found in Mexico City samples may be the results of more extensive combustion activities and a higher proportion of non-catalyst-equipped vehicles. This study confirms the usefulness of pine needles for source characterization as well as atmospheric organic contaminants monitoring on large spatial scales (e.g., national or global).

Journal

Atmospheric EnvironmentElsevier

Published: May 1, 2003

References

  • Temporal and spatial variations of the particle size distribution of PAHs and their dry deposition fluxes in Korea
    Bae, S.; Yi, S.; Kim, Y.
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments and mussels of the western Mediterranean Sea
    Baumard, P.; Budzinski, H.; Garrigue, P.
  • The use of mosses and pine needles to detect persistent organic pollutants at local and regional scales
    Holoubek, I.; Korinek, P.; Seda, Z.; Schneiderova, E.; Holoubkova, I.; Pacl, A.; Triska, J.; Cudlin, P.; Caslavsky, J.
  • Octanol/air partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls
    Kömp, P.; McLachlan, M.S.
  • Traffic contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the center of a large city
    Nielsen, T.
  • Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Seoul, Korea
    Park, S.S.; Kim, Y.J.; Kang, C.H.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off