Computer-related success and failure: a longitudinal field study of the factors influencing computer-related performance

Computer-related success and failure: a longitudinal field study of the factors influencing... This study used a path analysis of longitudinal data collected from 75 manufacturing employees participating in a computer training course, to test a model of the intrapersonal processes impacting computer-related performance. Gender, computer experience, and attributional style were found to be predictive of computer attitudes, which were in turn related to computer efficacy, task-specific performance expectations, and post-performance anxiety. Computer training was effective in raising user efficacy levels and improving computer performance. In addition, post-training efficacy was predictive of subsequent computer performance. Finally, performance outcomes and future performance expectations were predictive of users’ affective reactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers in Human Behavior Elsevier

Computer-related success and failure: a longitudinal field study of the factors influencing computer-related performance

Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 15 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0747-5632
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0747-5632(98)00030-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study used a path analysis of longitudinal data collected from 75 manufacturing employees participating in a computer training course, to test a model of the intrapersonal processes impacting computer-related performance. Gender, computer experience, and attributional style were found to be predictive of computer attitudes, which were in turn related to computer efficacy, task-specific performance expectations, and post-performance anxiety. Computer training was effective in raising user efficacy levels and improving computer performance. In addition, post-training efficacy was predictive of subsequent computer performance. Finally, performance outcomes and future performance expectations were predictive of users’ affective reactions.

Journal

Computers in Human BehaviorElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1999

References

  • Microcomputer usage as an opportunity: The influence of context on employee training
    Martocchio, J.J
  • Responses to successful and unsuccessful performance: The moderating effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between performance and attribution
    Silver, W.S; Mitchell, T.R; Gist, M.E

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