Comparison of the tribological behavior of steel–steel and Si 3 N 4 –steel contacts in lubricants with ZDDP or ionic liquid

Comparison of the tribological behavior of steel–steel and Si 3 N 4 –steel contacts in... 1 Introduction</h5> The viscosity grade of automotive engine oils has been continuously reduced over the past three decades to improve fuel economy, that is, from SAE 15W40 during the early 1980s to 0W30 in recent years. This reduction in viscosity is made possible through advances in base oils and additive packages, particularly, anti-wear (AW) additives [1,2] . The material composition and microstructure of the contact area at the bearing interface are known to have decisive roles in tribological behavior. A lubricant AW additive is designed to decompose under thermomechanical stresses during the wear process, and the decomposition products subsequently react with wear debris or the contact area to form a protective tribofilm on bearing surfaces [1] . The performance of a tribofilm is determined by its composition, microstructure, and thickness. These properties are influenced by many factors, including the composition and mechanical properties of the contact materials, the rheological behavior of the lubricant, the chemistry of the AW additive, and the experimental conditions (e.g., load, temperature, and speed). Therefore, the characteristics of the tribofilm are important to understand friction and wear performances.</P>Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) is the most common AW additive in automotive engine lubricants during the past half http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Comparison of the tribological behavior of steel–steel and Si 3 N 4 –steel contacts in lubricants with ZDDP or ionic liquid

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.wear.2014.08.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The viscosity grade of automotive engine oils has been continuously reduced over the past three decades to improve fuel economy, that is, from SAE 15W40 during the early 1980s to 0W30 in recent years. This reduction in viscosity is made possible through advances in base oils and additive packages, particularly, anti-wear (AW) additives [1,2] . The material composition and microstructure of the contact area at the bearing interface are known to have decisive roles in tribological behavior. A lubricant AW additive is designed to decompose under thermomechanical stresses during the wear process, and the decomposition products subsequently react with wear debris or the contact area to form a protective tribofilm on bearing surfaces [1] . The performance of a tribofilm is determined by its composition, microstructure, and thickness. These properties are influenced by many factors, including the composition and mechanical properties of the contact materials, the rheological behavior of the lubricant, the chemistry of the AW additive, and the experimental conditions (e.g., load, temperature, and speed). Therefore, the characteristics of the tribofilm are important to understand friction and wear performances.</P>Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) is the most common AW additive in automotive engine lubricants during the past half

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: Nov 15, 2014

References

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