Comparison of hemoglobin A1c measurements of samples with elevated fetal hemoglobin by three commercial assays

Comparison of hemoglobin A1c measurements of samples with elevated fetal hemoglobin by three... Dear Editor Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is the glycated form of hemoglobin A modified through a spontaneous, non-enzymatic reaction with glucose at the N-terminus of the β chain. The extent of glycation reaction is directly proportional to glucose concentration. Transient hyperglycemic status, for instance after meal, can only mildly affect glycation. HbA1c is therefore a strong indicator of long-term glycemic status. The measurements of HbA1c have been widely utilized for monitoring therapy for patients with diabetes mellitus and evaluating the risk of diabetes complications. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends including %HbA1c ≥ 6.5% as one of the criteria for diabetes diagnosis [1,2] . The allowable error for HbA1c proficiency tests performed by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) has decreased over several years to ± 7% of the target values in 2011, and may be reduced further to ± 6% in 2013, representing stricter requirements for clinical laboratories measuring HbA1c. For these reasons, factors interfering with HbA1c test results must be recognized.</P>Interferences of hemoglobin variants on commercially available HbA1c assays have been widely studied; however, compared to commonly seen HbS, C, D and E traits in hemoglobinopathy, the interfering effects of elevated HbF are less extensively examined http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinica Chimica Acta Elsevier

Comparison of hemoglobin A1c measurements of samples with elevated fetal hemoglobin by three commercial assays

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0009-8981
eISSN
1873-3492
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cca.2012.05.017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dear Editor Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is the glycated form of hemoglobin A modified through a spontaneous, non-enzymatic reaction with glucose at the N-terminus of the β chain. The extent of glycation reaction is directly proportional to glucose concentration. Transient hyperglycemic status, for instance after meal, can only mildly affect glycation. HbA1c is therefore a strong indicator of long-term glycemic status. The measurements of HbA1c have been widely utilized for monitoring therapy for patients with diabetes mellitus and evaluating the risk of diabetes complications. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends including %HbA1c ≥ 6.5% as one of the criteria for diabetes diagnosis [1,2] . The allowable error for HbA1c proficiency tests performed by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) has decreased over several years to ± 7% of the target values in 2011, and may be reduced further to ± 6% in 2013, representing stricter requirements for clinical laboratories measuring HbA1c. For these reasons, factors interfering with HbA1c test results must be recognized.</P>Interferences of hemoglobin variants on commercially available HbA1c assays have been widely studied; however, compared to commonly seen HbS, C, D and E traits in hemoglobinopathy, the interfering effects of elevated HbF are less extensively examined

Journal

Clinica Chimica ActaElsevier

Published: Oct 9, 2012

References

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