Comparison of Characteristics of Future Myocardial Infarctions in Women With Baseline High Versus Baseline Low Levels of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein

Comparison of Characteristics of Future Myocardial Infarctions in Women With Baseline High Versus... High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has previously been shown to be an independent predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the association between hs-CRP and the severity of cardiovascular events that occur. This study compared characteristics of incident myocardial infarctions (MIs) in 40 initially healthy women with very high baseline hs-CRP levels (>7.5 mg/L) with infarctions in 40 women with very low hs-CRP levels (≤1 mg/L). At baseline, very high hs-CRP was associated with a clinical diagnosis of hypertension, higher body mass index, lower high-density lipoprotein, and higher triglycerides. Our analysis found that the 2 study groups had similar proportions of ST-segment elevations on electrocardiograms, peak cardiac enzyme levels, postinfarct left ventricular function, and burden of coronary atherosclerosis seen on angiography. However, subjects with very high hs-CRP levels developed infarctions significantly sooner than those with very low hs-CRP levels (median time to event 4.45 vs 6.64 years, respectively, p <0.0001). In addition, higher baseline levels of hs-CRP were associated with significantly more fatal MIs (0% vs 4.6% vs 9.6% in subjects with hs-CRP levels <1, 1 to <3, and ≥3 mg/L, respectively, p for trend = 0.02). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in initially healthy women high levels of hs-CRP predict earlier occurrence of MIs and a greater likelihood that infarctions will be fatal. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Cardiology Elsevier

Comparison of Characteristics of Future Myocardial Infarctions in Women With Baseline High Versus Baseline Low Levels of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0002-9149
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.01.022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has previously been shown to be an independent predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the association between hs-CRP and the severity of cardiovascular events that occur. This study compared characteristics of incident myocardial infarctions (MIs) in 40 initially healthy women with very high baseline hs-CRP levels (>7.5 mg/L) with infarctions in 40 women with very low hs-CRP levels (≤1 mg/L). At baseline, very high hs-CRP was associated with a clinical diagnosis of hypertension, higher body mass index, lower high-density lipoprotein, and higher triglycerides. Our analysis found that the 2 study groups had similar proportions of ST-segment elevations on electrocardiograms, peak cardiac enzyme levels, postinfarct left ventricular function, and burden of coronary atherosclerosis seen on angiography. However, subjects with very high hs-CRP levels developed infarctions significantly sooner than those with very low hs-CRP levels (median time to event 4.45 vs 6.64 years, respectively, p <0.0001). In addition, higher baseline levels of hs-CRP were associated with significantly more fatal MIs (0% vs 4.6% vs 9.6% in subjects with hs-CRP levels <1, 1 to <3, and ≥3 mg/L, respectively, p for trend = 0.02). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in initially healthy women high levels of hs-CRP predict earlier occurrence of MIs and a greater likelihood that infarctions will be fatal.

Journal

The American Journal of CardiologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2007

References

  • Involvement of C-reactive protein obtained by directional coronary atherectomy in plaque instability and developing restenosis in patients with stable or unstable angina pectoris
    Ishikawa, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Imamura, T.; Date, H.; Shibata, Y.; Hikichi, Y.; Asada, Y.; Eto, T.
  • Lack of association of C-reactive protein and coronary calcium by electron beam computed tomography in postmenopausal women: implications for coronary artery disease screening
    Redberg, R.F.; Rifai, N.; Gee, L.; Ridker, P.M.
  • C-reactive protein is not associated with the presence or extent of calcified subclinical atherosclerosis
    Hunt, M.E.; O’Malley, P.G.; Vernalis, M.N.; Feuerstein, I.M.; Taylor, A.J.
  • Variability and classification accuracy of serial high-sensitivity C-reactive protein measurements in healthy adults
    Ockene, I.S.; Matthews, C.E.; Rifai, N.; Ridker, P.M.; Reed, G.; Stanek, E.

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