Compacting CNT sponge to achieve larger electromagnetic interference shielding performance

Compacting CNT sponge to achieve larger electromagnetic interference shielding performance The present study reports a simple route for the synthesis of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges by vacuum assisted filtration of CNT bundles of variable compaction ratios and its epoxy (EP) composites with superior electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance. The electrical and mechanical properties of CNT sponge/EP composites were investigated and findings enabled identification of a sponge compaction ratio of 70% as optimum for the improvement of the electrical conductivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the material, by 138 and 41%, respectively, compared to uncompacted samples. Mechanical properties of the composites were also enhanced with the yield strength and elastic modulus of the composite of a compaction ratio of 70% improved by 17 and 25%, respectively compared to pure epoxy. These results indicate that CNT sponge with a higher compaction ratio is a potential filler for mechanically strong and high-performance EMI shielding nanocomposites. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Materials & design Elsevier

Compacting CNT sponge to achieve larger electromagnetic interference shielding performance

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0264-1275
eISSN
0141-5530
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.matdes.2018.02.047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study reports a simple route for the synthesis of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges by vacuum assisted filtration of CNT bundles of variable compaction ratios and its epoxy (EP) composites with superior electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance. The electrical and mechanical properties of CNT sponge/EP composites were investigated and findings enabled identification of a sponge compaction ratio of 70% as optimum for the improvement of the electrical conductivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the material, by 138 and 41%, respectively, compared to uncompacted samples. Mechanical properties of the composites were also enhanced with the yield strength and elastic modulus of the composite of a compaction ratio of 70% improved by 17 and 25%, respectively compared to pure epoxy. These results indicate that CNT sponge with a higher compaction ratio is a potential filler for mechanically strong and high-performance EMI shielding nanocomposites.

Journal

Materials & designElsevier

Published: Apr 15, 2018

References

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