Community-Managed Forests, Household Fuelwood Use and Food Consumption

Community-Managed Forests, Household Fuelwood Use and Food Consumption This paper evaluates the role of use of community-managed forests as a means of improving economic well-being of rural Nepalese households. It utilizes a nationwide survey consisting of detailed questionnaires related to household welfare and employs instrumental variable (IV) approach to investigate the linkage between community-managed forests and food consumption in Nepal. Results show that households that use community-managed forests for firewood spend significantly more on food consumption than those dependent on government-managed forests. The study further finds that community-managed forest users appear to be more participatory and are more likely to find their food consumption adequate. Together, these results provide compelling evidence that community-managed forests can be an effective means of addressing food insecurity in a developing country setting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Economics Elsevier

Community-Managed Forests, Household Fuelwood Use and Food Consumption

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0921-8009
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecolecon.2018.01.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper evaluates the role of use of community-managed forests as a means of improving economic well-being of rural Nepalese households. It utilizes a nationwide survey consisting of detailed questionnaires related to household welfare and employs instrumental variable (IV) approach to investigate the linkage between community-managed forests and food consumption in Nepal. Results show that households that use community-managed forests for firewood spend significantly more on food consumption than those dependent on government-managed forests. The study further finds that community-managed forest users appear to be more participatory and are more likely to find their food consumption adequate. Together, these results provide compelling evidence that community-managed forests can be an effective means of addressing food insecurity in a developing country setting.

Journal

Ecological EconomicsElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

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