Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources

Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources The literature on common property-based resource management comprises many important studies that seek to specify the conditions under which groups of users will self-organize and sustainably govern resources upon which they depend. Using three of the more comprehensive such studies, and with an extensive review of writings on the commons, this paper demonstrates that the enterprise of generating lists of conditions under which commons are governed sustainably is a flawed and impossibly costly research task. For a way out, the paper examines the relative merits of statistical, comparative, and case study approaches to studying the commons. It ends with a plea for careful research design and sample selection, construction of causal mechanisms, and a shift toward comparative and statistical rather than single-case analyses. Such steps are necessary for a coherent, empirically-relevant theory of the commons. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Development Elsevier

Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources

World Development, Volume 29 (10) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0305-750X
eISSN
1873-5991
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0305-750X(01)00063-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The literature on common property-based resource management comprises many important studies that seek to specify the conditions under which groups of users will self-organize and sustainably govern resources upon which they depend. Using three of the more comprehensive such studies, and with an extensive review of writings on the commons, this paper demonstrates that the enterprise of generating lists of conditions under which commons are governed sustainably is a flawed and impossibly costly research task. For a way out, the paper examines the relative merits of statistical, comparative, and case study approaches to studying the commons. It ends with a plea for careful research design and sample selection, construction of causal mechanisms, and a shift toward comparative and statistical rather than single-case analyses. Such steps are necessary for a coherent, empirically-relevant theory of the commons.

Journal

World DevelopmentElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2001

References

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