Comment on: “Evidence for the existence of stable-water-clusters at room temperature and normal pressure” (Phys. Lett. A 373 (2009) 3872)

Comment on: “Evidence for the existence of stable-water-clusters at room temperature and normal... There has been a continuous effort of numerous researchers to reveal structure of liquid water over the last decades. Thus characterising water clusters has been and continues to be a very active field of study, in which not only scientists, but also public is interested hoping to understand the mechanisms involved in anomalous properties of water.</P>In a recent paper [1] the authors claim to bring (further) evidence for the existence of stable water clusters (size of the order of tens of nanometres to microns) through their experiments analysing the structures of dry residua of highly diluted NaCl solutions using an atomic force microscope, an electric force microscope and infrared and Raman spectroscopy.</P>However, we think that from a methodological point of view the paper is not clear and transparent enough to allow any interpretation in terms of evidence of existence (stable water clusters). It allows at most the suggestion of a tentative hypothesis. We have several comments on the method and interpretation: (a) There is detailed description of measures taken to keep the experimental environment clean (e.g. Class 100 clean-room with argon atmosphere 99.999%) and water ultra-pure, but there is no information about glass quality requirements and handling of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physics Letters A Elsevier

Comment on: “Evidence for the existence of stable-water-clusters at room temperature and normal pressure” (Phys. Lett. A 373 (2009) 3872)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0375-9601
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.physleta.2013.07.060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There has been a continuous effort of numerous researchers to reveal structure of liquid water over the last decades. Thus characterising water clusters has been and continues to be a very active field of study, in which not only scientists, but also public is interested hoping to understand the mechanisms involved in anomalous properties of water.</P>In a recent paper [1] the authors claim to bring (further) evidence for the existence of stable water clusters (size of the order of tens of nanometres to microns) through their experiments analysing the structures of dry residua of highly diluted NaCl solutions using an atomic force microscope, an electric force microscope and infrared and Raman spectroscopy.</P>However, we think that from a methodological point of view the paper is not clear and transparent enough to allow any interpretation in terms of evidence of existence (stable water clusters). It allows at most the suggestion of a tentative hypothesis. We have several comments on the method and interpretation: (a) There is detailed description of measures taken to keep the experimental environment clean (e.g. Class 100 clean-room with argon atmosphere 99.999%) and water ultra-pure, but there is no information about glass quality requirements and handling of

Journal

Physics Letters AElsevier

Published: Nov 22, 2013

References

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