Cloud deposition to a spruce forest edge

Cloud deposition to a spruce forest edge Deposition from clouds to a spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) forest edge on Hunter Mt. in the Catskill Mts of New York State was measured during 1987 and 1988 to determine whether the windward edge of forest floor receives greater deposition of water and ions via cloud water than the interior of a forest. Throughfall was used as a measure of deposition and was collected during cloud-only and mixed cloud-and-rain events along five windward-to-leeward transects in a 30 x 30 m forested area. Ambient cloud water was also collected in a passive collector and chemically analyzed. Trees at the edge of the forest received on average three times, and up to 15 times, greater deposition of ions than those in the interior of the forest. Lead content in samples from Hunter Mt. forest floor at the windward edge, relative to the interior, was enhanced as well. Using a regression of distance vs deposition, the deposition “half-distance”, (i.e. the point at which the rate of cloud water deposition is 50% of the rate at the windward edge of the forest) was found to be 28 m. The cloud deposition data from this study are compared to other studies of Na particle deposition to low-elevation forest edges, which show similar deposition “half distances”, ranging from ∼ 2 to 36 m into the forest. Most models of cloud deposition currently in use assume landscape homogeneity. Montane forest landscapes, however, are often highly heterogeneous, consisting of many “edges”, and thus current models may seriously underestimate cloud deposition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Atmospheric Environment Elsevier

Cloud deposition to a spruce forest edge

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1352-2310
eISSN
1873-2844
D.O.I.
10.1016/1352-2310(94)00317-E
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Deposition from clouds to a spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) forest edge on Hunter Mt. in the Catskill Mts of New York State was measured during 1987 and 1988 to determine whether the windward edge of forest floor receives greater deposition of water and ions via cloud water than the interior of a forest. Throughfall was used as a measure of deposition and was collected during cloud-only and mixed cloud-and-rain events along five windward-to-leeward transects in a 30 x 30 m forested area. Ambient cloud water was also collected in a passive collector and chemically analyzed. Trees at the edge of the forest received on average three times, and up to 15 times, greater deposition of ions than those in the interior of the forest. Lead content in samples from Hunter Mt. forest floor at the windward edge, relative to the interior, was enhanced as well. Using a regression of distance vs deposition, the deposition “half-distance”, (i.e. the point at which the rate of cloud water deposition is 50% of the rate at the windward edge of the forest) was found to be 28 m. The cloud deposition data from this study are compared to other studies of Na particle deposition to low-elevation forest edges, which show similar deposition “half distances”, ranging from ∼ 2 to 36 m into the forest. Most models of cloud deposition currently in use assume landscape homogeneity. Montane forest landscapes, however, are often highly heterogeneous, consisting of many “edges”, and thus current models may seriously underestimate cloud deposition.

Journal

Atmospheric EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • The role of nitrate in the acidification of streams in the Catskill Mountains of New York
    Murdoch, P.S.; Stoddard, J.L.
  • Trends in Catskill stream water quality: evidence from historical data
    Stoddard, J.L.

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