Chemical and geotechnical assessment of low organic foundation soils across the coastal area of Southwestern Nigeria

Chemical and geotechnical assessment of low organic foundation soils across the coastal area of... Pressure on land use has caused great site development along the coastal area of south western Nigeria. However, research works for the purpose of evaluating appropriate depths of foundations in the area were without cognizance of engineering challenges that may ensue as a result of the organic content, and associated factors of the soils. This paper evaluates the compositional effects of the soils on foundation materials, and a phenomenological model of compressibility of fines during design and construction of problem-free foundations in the area. Thirty (30) disturbed soils were analysed for moisture content, grain size distribution, consistency limits, chloride, pH and sulphate, while the oedometer consolidation test was carried out on another 30 undisturbed soils. The stratigraphic sequence in the profile comprises medium dense to coarse grained silty clayey sand to 16.80 m depth, below loose grey organic silty clayey sand from the surface. Results show in most cases, that the foundation soils contain insignificant percentages (0.95–5.8%) of organic solids. Moisture content (44–70%), chloride (74.9 ppm), sulphate (420 ppm) ions concentration and pH (8.96) could enhance the corrosive potential of the soils. It is recommended that Portland cement concrete will be suitable in the environment. Foundation settlement with respect to surface area (0.028≤ mv ≤ 0.434m2MN−1 at 200 kNm−2; 0.038mv ≤ 0.776m2MN−1 at 400 kNm−2; 0.038≤ mv ≤ 0.879m2MN−1 at 800 kNm−2) ranges from low to medium compressibility with respect to consolidation pressure. Therefore, footings load need be spread over the soils, and foundation design need be based on site-specific soil information. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Earth Sciences Elsevier

Chemical and geotechnical assessment of low organic foundation soils across the coastal area of Southwestern Nigeria

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1464-343X
eISSN
1879-1956
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2017.12.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pressure on land use has caused great site development along the coastal area of south western Nigeria. However, research works for the purpose of evaluating appropriate depths of foundations in the area were without cognizance of engineering challenges that may ensue as a result of the organic content, and associated factors of the soils. This paper evaluates the compositional effects of the soils on foundation materials, and a phenomenological model of compressibility of fines during design and construction of problem-free foundations in the area. Thirty (30) disturbed soils were analysed for moisture content, grain size distribution, consistency limits, chloride, pH and sulphate, while the oedometer consolidation test was carried out on another 30 undisturbed soils. The stratigraphic sequence in the profile comprises medium dense to coarse grained silty clayey sand to 16.80 m depth, below loose grey organic silty clayey sand from the surface. Results show in most cases, that the foundation soils contain insignificant percentages (0.95–5.8%) of organic solids. Moisture content (44–70%), chloride (74.9 ppm), sulphate (420 ppm) ions concentration and pH (8.96) could enhance the corrosive potential of the soils. It is recommended that Portland cement concrete will be suitable in the environment. Foundation settlement with respect to surface area (0.028≤ mv ≤ 0.434m2MN−1 at 200 kNm−2; 0.038mv ≤ 0.776m2MN−1 at 400 kNm−2; 0.038≤ mv ≤ 0.879m2MN−1 at 800 kNm−2) ranges from low to medium compressibility with respect to consolidation pressure. Therefore, footings load need be spread over the soils, and foundation design need be based on site-specific soil information.

Journal

Journal of African Earth SciencesElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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