Characterization of onion lectin ( Allium cepa agglutinin) as an immunomodulatory protein inducing Th1-type immune response in vitro

Characterization of onion lectin ( Allium cepa agglutinin) as an immunomodulatory protein... 1 Introduction</h5> Nutritional status plays an important role in the functioning of the immune system. In recent years, epidemiological and clinical data suggest that nutritional deficiency is a risk to immunocompetence and increases the risk of infection [1] . Certain foods are known to boost the immune system; examples include garlic ( Allium sativum ), onion ( Allium cepa ), ginger, sweet potato, oregano, avocado, mushrooms and a few others. Lectins are proteins of non-immune origin containing at least one non-catalytic domain, which binds specifically and reversibly to monosaccharides and/or oligosaccharides [2,3] . Lectins are present in diverse dietary sources; however, only a small number of lectins from food sources are known for their immunomodulatory activity [4] . Several plant lectins exert immunomodulatory activities that are initiated by their interaction with glycan moieties present on the surface of immune cells. Such interactions trigger signal transduction leading to the production of certain cytokines and promote efficient immune responses against microbial infections. By utilizing glycan and lectin microarrays for glycomics, it is possible to identify new immunomodulatory lectins for potential therapeutic applications [5] .</P>The first citation of onion is found in the Codex Ebers (1550 B.C.), an Egyptian medical papyrus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Immunopharmacology Elsevier

Characterization of onion lectin ( Allium cepa agglutinin) as an immunomodulatory protein inducing Th1-type immune response in vitro

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
1567-5769
eISSN
1878-1705
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.intimp.2015.04.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Nutritional status plays an important role in the functioning of the immune system. In recent years, epidemiological and clinical data suggest that nutritional deficiency is a risk to immunocompetence and increases the risk of infection [1] . Certain foods are known to boost the immune system; examples include garlic ( Allium sativum ), onion ( Allium cepa ), ginger, sweet potato, oregano, avocado, mushrooms and a few others. Lectins are proteins of non-immune origin containing at least one non-catalytic domain, which binds specifically and reversibly to monosaccharides and/or oligosaccharides [2,3] . Lectins are present in diverse dietary sources; however, only a small number of lectins from food sources are known for their immunomodulatory activity [4] . Several plant lectins exert immunomodulatory activities that are initiated by their interaction with glycan moieties present on the surface of immune cells. Such interactions trigger signal transduction leading to the production of certain cytokines and promote efficient immune responses against microbial infections. By utilizing glycan and lectin microarrays for glycomics, it is possible to identify new immunomodulatory lectins for potential therapeutic applications [5] .</P>The first citation of onion is found in the Codex Ebers (1550 B.C.), an Egyptian medical papyrus

Journal

International ImmunopharmacologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2015

References

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