Characterization of laboratory analogs of interstellar/cometary organic residues using very high resolution mass spectrometry

Characterization of laboratory analogs of interstellar/cometary organic residues using very high... Studying the chemical composition of organic matter in astrophysical environments is an important means to improve our understanding of its origin and evolution. This organic matter evolves from molecular clouds to protoplanetary disks, and as a final destination, takes part in the formation of many objects of our solar system, such as primitive chondritic material, planetesimals and finally planets. In this contribution, we perform experimental simulations based on the VUV irradiation and warming-up of primitive interstellar ice analogs (CH3OH:NH3:H2O), and characterize, for the first time, the resulting refractory residue, using very high resolution mass spectrometry (VHRMS) with an LTQ-orbitrap-XL instrument. An electrospray source allows ionizing all the molecules having proton donor or acceptor chemical functions, while limiting as much as possible their damages. Thus, this method provides the analysis of the whole ionizable molecules making up the residue. The analysis of the spectra shows that these residues contain a large number of molecules formed of CHNO elements, including macromolecular entities beyond 4000Da. The average elemental composition of the residue is of H/C=1.5, N/C=0.4, O/C=0.4. These first results are tentatively compared to VHRMS analyses of the soluble organic matter (SOM) present in the Murchison’s meteorite, a primitive chondrite of the CM class. The molecular richness observed can be considered as the “first step” of the complex abiotic organic matter in extraterrestrial media. This initial matter, that may be rather universal, could then evolve toward more processed materials in parent bodies, such as comets and asteroids, materials that are then observed and subsequently analyzed in meteorites found on Earth. In addition to providing some insight on the mixture complexity, VHRMS allows for the search of specific molecules. For instance, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and some of its derivatives are identified in these residues. With the possibility to characterize the whole residue as well as some specific molecules, we consider that VHRMS is a powerful analytical tool for the understanding of the chemical evolution of organic matter in astrophysical environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta Elsevier

Characterization of laboratory analogs of interstellar/cometary organic residues using very high resolution mass spectrometry

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/characterization-of-laboratory-analogs-of-interstellar-cometary-wdf0D0cXCc
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0016-7037
eISSN
1872-9533
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.gca.2013.05.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Studying the chemical composition of organic matter in astrophysical environments is an important means to improve our understanding of its origin and evolution. This organic matter evolves from molecular clouds to protoplanetary disks, and as a final destination, takes part in the formation of many objects of our solar system, such as primitive chondritic material, planetesimals and finally planets. In this contribution, we perform experimental simulations based on the VUV irradiation and warming-up of primitive interstellar ice analogs (CH3OH:NH3:H2O), and characterize, for the first time, the resulting refractory residue, using very high resolution mass spectrometry (VHRMS) with an LTQ-orbitrap-XL instrument. An electrospray source allows ionizing all the molecules having proton donor or acceptor chemical functions, while limiting as much as possible their damages. Thus, this method provides the analysis of the whole ionizable molecules making up the residue. The analysis of the spectra shows that these residues contain a large number of molecules formed of CHNO elements, including macromolecular entities beyond 4000Da. The average elemental composition of the residue is of H/C=1.5, N/C=0.4, O/C=0.4. These first results are tentatively compared to VHRMS analyses of the soluble organic matter (SOM) present in the Murchison’s meteorite, a primitive chondrite of the CM class. The molecular richness observed can be considered as the “first step” of the complex abiotic organic matter in extraterrestrial media. This initial matter, that may be rather universal, could then evolve toward more processed materials in parent bodies, such as comets and asteroids, materials that are then observed and subsequently analyzed in meteorites found on Earth. In addition to providing some insight on the mixture complexity, VHRMS allows for the search of specific molecules. For instance, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and some of its derivatives are identified in these residues. With the possibility to characterize the whole residue as well as some specific molecules, we consider that VHRMS is a powerful analytical tool for the understanding of the chemical evolution of organic matter in astrophysical environments.

Journal

Geochimica et Cosmochimica ActaElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2013

References

  • Interstellar matrices: the chemical composition and evolution of interstellar ices as observed by ISO
    d’Hendecourt, L.; Dartois, E.
  • Model of molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter isolated from Murchison meteorite
    Derenne, S.; Robert, F.
  • NMR identification of hexamethylenetetramine and its precursor in Titan tholins: implications for Titan prebiotic chemistry
    He, C.; Lin, G.; Smith, M.A.
  • Reactions of nitriles in ices relevant to Titan, comets, and the interstellar medium: formation of cyanate, ketenimines, and isonitriles
    Hudson, R.L.; Moore, M.H.
  • Linear high resolution dust mass spectrometer for a mission to the Galilean satellites
    Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.; Mocker, A.; Postberg, F.; Hillier, J.K.; Horányi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Abel, B.; Beinsen, A.; Thissen, R.; Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.; Altobelli, N.
  • N-(2-Aminoethyl)glycine and amino acids from interstellar ice analogues
    Meinert, C.; Filippi, J.J.; de Marcellus, P.; Le Sergeant d’Hendecourt, L.; Meierhenrich, U.J.
  • New insight on aliphatic linkages in the macromolecular organic fraction of Orgueil and Murchison meteorites through ruthenium tetroxide oxidation
    Remusat, L.; Derenne, S.; Robert, F.
  • Progressive aqueous alteration of CM carbonaceous chondrites
    Rubin, A.E.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J.M.; Huber, H.; Wasson, J.T.
  • Very high resolution mass spectrometry of HCN polymers and tholins
    Vuitton, V.; Bonnet, J.-Y.; Frisari, M.; Thissen, R.; Quirico, E.; Dutuit, O.; Schmitt, B.; Le Roy, L.; Fray, N.; Cottin, H.; Sciamma-O’Brien, E.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off