Changing eastern broadleaf, southern mixed, and northern mixed forest ecosystems of the eastern United States

Changing eastern broadleaf, southern mixed, and northern mixed forest ecosystems of the eastern... 1 Introduction</h5> Identification of changes in forest composition provides information about current trajectories and potentially, future forests. Historically, presence and type of fire regime was a major determinant of forest types in the eastern United States. Open forest ecosystems of fire-tolerant oak or pine species covered most of the eastern United States, where indigenous cultures were agrarian and used frequent surface fire as a tool ( Delcourt et al., 1998; Fuller et al., 1998; Lorimer, 2001; Cogbill et al., 2002; Black et al., 2006; Nowacki and Abrams, 2008; Hanberry et al., 2012a, 2012b ). Regular stand-replacing fires (50–150 year return intervals) in northern mixed forests produced dense tamarack, aspen, and birch forests with variable densities of pine ( Frelich and Reich, 1995; Hanberry et al., 2012b ). In regions where there was not a fire regime, due to fire breaks or environmental limits on agriculture, mature forests of American beech ( Fagus grandifolia ; see Tables 1 and 2 for scientific names of other species), sugar maple, and eastern hemlock developed in eastern broadleaf forests, spruce and fir in northern mixed forests, probably American beech along with relatively long-lived species such as yellow-poplar ( Liriodendron tulipifera ) and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forest Ecology and Management Elsevier

Changing eastern broadleaf, southern mixed, and northern mixed forest ecosystems of the eastern United States

Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 306 – Oct 15, 2013

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0378-1127
eISSN
1872-7042
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foreco.2013.06.040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Identification of changes in forest composition provides information about current trajectories and potentially, future forests. Historically, presence and type of fire regime was a major determinant of forest types in the eastern United States. Open forest ecosystems of fire-tolerant oak or pine species covered most of the eastern United States, where indigenous cultures were agrarian and used frequent surface fire as a tool ( Delcourt et al., 1998; Fuller et al., 1998; Lorimer, 2001; Cogbill et al., 2002; Black et al., 2006; Nowacki and Abrams, 2008; Hanberry et al., 2012a, 2012b ). Regular stand-replacing fires (50–150 year return intervals) in northern mixed forests produced dense tamarack, aspen, and birch forests with variable densities of pine ( Frelich and Reich, 1995; Hanberry et al., 2012b ). In regions where there was not a fire regime, due to fire breaks or environmental limits on agriculture, mature forests of American beech ( Fagus grandifolia ; see Tables 1 and 2 for scientific names of other species), sugar maple, and eastern hemlock developed in eastern broadleaf forests, spruce and fir in northern mixed forests, probably American beech along with relatively long-lived species such as yellow-poplar ( Liriodendron tulipifera ) and

Journal

Forest Ecology and ManagementElsevier

Published: Oct 15, 2013

References

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