Challenges of the Nano–Bio Interface in Lateral Flow and Dipstick Immunoassays

Challenges of the Nano–Bio Interface in Lateral Flow and Dipstick Immunoassays Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are highly attractive for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for infectious disease, food safety, and many other medical uses. The unique optical, electronic, and chemical properties that arise from the nanostructured and material characteristics of nanoparticles provide an opportunity to increase LFA sensitivity and impart novel capabilities. However, interfacing to nanomaterials in complex biological environments is challenging and can result in undesirable side effects such as non-specific adsorption, protein denaturation, and steric hindrance. These issues are even more acute in LFAs where there are many different types of inorganic–biological interfaces, often of a complex nature. Therefore, the unique properties of nanomaterials for LFAs must be exploited in a way that addresses these interface challenges. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Trends in Biotechnology Elsevier

Challenges of the Nano–Bio Interface in Lateral Flow and Dipstick Immunoassays

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0167-7799
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.tibtech.2017.09.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are highly attractive for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for infectious disease, food safety, and many other medical uses. The unique optical, electronic, and chemical properties that arise from the nanostructured and material characteristics of nanoparticles provide an opportunity to increase LFA sensitivity and impart novel capabilities. However, interfacing to nanomaterials in complex biological environments is challenging and can result in undesirable side effects such as non-specific adsorption, protein denaturation, and steric hindrance. These issues are even more acute in LFAs where there are many different types of inorganic–biological interfaces, often of a complex nature. Therefore, the unique properties of nanomaterials for LFAs must be exploited in a way that addresses these interface challenges.

Journal

Trends in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2017

References

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