Central circuits mediating patterned autonomic activity during active vs. passive emotional coping

Central circuits mediating patterned autonomic activity during active vs. passive emotional coping fight or flight—are particularly adaptive if the stress is escapable. On the other hand, passive emotional coping strategies—quiescence, immobility, decreased responsiveness to the environment—are useful when the stress is inescapable. Passive strategies contribute also to facilitating recovery and healing once the stressful event is over. Active vs. passive emotional coping strategies are characterised further by distinct patterns of autonomic change. Active strategies are associated with sympathoexcitation (hypertension, tachycardia), whereas passive strategies are associated with sympathoinhibitory patterns (hypotension, bradycardia). Distinct neural substrates mediating active vs. passive emotional coping have been identified within the longitudinal neuronal columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray region (PAG). The PAG offers then a potentially useful point of entry for delineating neural circuits mediating the different forms of emotional coping and their associated patterns of autonomic activity. As one example, recent studies of the connections of orbital and medial prefrontal cortical (PFC) fields with specific PAG longitudinal neuronal columns are reviewed. Findings of discrete orbital and medial PFC projections to different PAG columns, and related PFC and PAG columnar connections with specific subregions of the hypothalamus, suggest that distinct but parallel circuits mediate the behavioural strategies and patterns of autonomic activity characteristic of emotional “engagement with” or “disengagement from” the external environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Bulletin Elsevier

Central circuits mediating patterned autonomic activity during active vs. passive emotional coping

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.
ISSN
0361-9230
eISSN
1873-2747
DOI
10.1016/S0361-9230(00)00313-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

fight or flight—are particularly adaptive if the stress is escapable. On the other hand, passive emotional coping strategies—quiescence, immobility, decreased responsiveness to the environment—are useful when the stress is inescapable. Passive strategies contribute also to facilitating recovery and healing once the stressful event is over. Active vs. passive emotional coping strategies are characterised further by distinct patterns of autonomic change. Active strategies are associated with sympathoexcitation (hypertension, tachycardia), whereas passive strategies are associated with sympathoinhibitory patterns (hypotension, bradycardia). Distinct neural substrates mediating active vs. passive emotional coping have been identified within the longitudinal neuronal columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray region (PAG). The PAG offers then a potentially useful point of entry for delineating neural circuits mediating the different forms of emotional coping and their associated patterns of autonomic activity. As one example, recent studies of the connections of orbital and medial prefrontal cortical (PFC) fields with specific PAG longitudinal neuronal columns are reviewed. Findings of discrete orbital and medial PFC projections to different PAG columns, and related PFC and PAG columnar connections with specific subregions of the hypothalamus, suggest that distinct but parallel circuits mediate the behavioural strategies and patterns of autonomic activity characteristic of emotional “engagement with” or “disengagement from” the external environment.

Journal

Brain Research BulletinElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2000

References

  • Increased fos-like immunoreactivity in the periaqueductal gray of anaesthetised rats during opiate withdrawal
    Chieng, B.; Keay, K.A.; Christie, M.J.
  • Quiescence and hyporeactivity evoked by activation of cell bodies in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray of the rat
    Depaulis, A.; Keay, K.A.; Bandler, R.
  • Location and properties of dorsal horn neurons at origin of spinoreticular tract in lumbar enlargement of the rat
    Menétrey, D.; Chaouch, A.; Besson, J.M.
  • Immobility and flight associated with antinociception produced by activation of ventral and lateral/dorsal regions of the rat periaqueductal gray
    Morgan, M.M.; Whitney, P.K.; Gold, M.S.
  • Systemic nitroglycerin induces Fos immunoreactivity in brainstem and forebrain structures of the rat
    Tassorelli, C.; Joseph, S.A.
  • Midbrain central gray
    Verberne, A.; Guyenet, P.

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