Cell death in health and disease: the biology and regulation of apoptosis

Cell death in health and disease: the biology and regulation of apoptosis Apoptosis is a morphologically stereotyped form of cell death, prevalent in multicellular organisms, by which single cells are deleted from the midst of living tissues. Recognition of the cellular corpses and their removal by phagocytosis occurs without disturbance to tissue architecture or function and without initiating inflammation. Apoptosis is regulable and is of fundamental importance to tissue development and homeostasis. Cellular susceptibility to apoptosis is determined by a variety of signals, of both extracellular and internal origin, including proliferative status. Dysregulated apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases including neoplasia, and recognition of the defects involved is prompting development of new therapeutic strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Seminars in Cancer Biology Elsevier

Cell death in health and disease: the biology and regulation of apoptosis

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1044-579X
eISSN
1096-3650
DOI
10.1006/scbi.1995.0002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Apoptosis is a morphologically stereotyped form of cell death, prevalent in multicellular organisms, by which single cells are deleted from the midst of living tissues. Recognition of the cellular corpses and their removal by phagocytosis occurs without disturbance to tissue architecture or function and without initiating inflammation. Apoptosis is regulable and is of fundamental importance to tissue development and homeostasis. Cellular susceptibility to apoptosis is determined by a variety of signals, of both extracellular and internal origin, including proliferative status. Dysregulated apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases including neoplasia, and recognition of the defects involved is prompting development of new therapeutic strategies.

Journal

Seminars in Cancer BiologyElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 1995

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