CB1 receptor knockout mice show similar behavioral modifications to wild-type mice when enkephalin catabolism is inhibited

CB1 receptor knockout mice show similar behavioral modifications to wild-type mice when... Behavioral and biochemical studies have suggested a functional link between the endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems such as a common pathway stimulating the dopaminergic system, a facilitation of signal-transduction- and/or a cannabinoid-induced enhancement of opioid peptide release. However, at this time, all the studies have been performed with exogenous agonists (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or morphine), leading to a generally excessive stimulation of receptors normally stimulated by endogenous effectors (anandamide or opioid peptides) in various brain structures. To overcome this problem, we have measured various behavioral responses induced by the stimulation of the endogenous opioid system using the dual inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, RB101, in CB1 receptor knockout mice. Thus, analgesia, locomotor activity, anxiety and antidepressant-like effects were measured after RB101 administration (80 and 120 mg/kg i.p. or 10 mg/kg, i.v.) in CB1 receptor knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. In all the experiments, inhibition of enkephalin catabolism produced similar modifications in behavior observed in CB1 knockout and wild-type mice. These results suggest limited physiological interaction between cannabinoid and opioid systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Elsevier

CB1 receptor knockout mice show similar behavioral modifications to wild-type mice when enkephalin catabolism is inhibited

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/cb1-receptor-knockout-mice-show-similar-behavioral-modifications-to-pLL0o7tfFc
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0006-8993
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.brainres.2005.09.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Behavioral and biochemical studies have suggested a functional link between the endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems such as a common pathway stimulating the dopaminergic system, a facilitation of signal-transduction- and/or a cannabinoid-induced enhancement of opioid peptide release. However, at this time, all the studies have been performed with exogenous agonists (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or morphine), leading to a generally excessive stimulation of receptors normally stimulated by endogenous effectors (anandamide or opioid peptides) in various brain structures. To overcome this problem, we have measured various behavioral responses induced by the stimulation of the endogenous opioid system using the dual inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, RB101, in CB1 receptor knockout mice. Thus, analgesia, locomotor activity, anxiety and antidepressant-like effects were measured after RB101 administration (80 and 120 mg/kg i.p. or 10 mg/kg, i.v.) in CB1 receptor knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. In all the experiments, inhibition of enkephalin catabolism produced similar modifications in behavior observed in CB1 knockout and wild-type mice. These results suggest limited physiological interaction between cannabinoid and opioid systems.

Journal

Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Nov 23, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off