Cavitation erosion and hydroabrasion resistance of cold work tool steels produced by powder metallurgy

Cavitation erosion and hydroabrasion resistance of cold work tool steels produced by powder... Carbide-rich cold work tool steels produced by powder metallurgy are designed for applications that are exposed to heavy abrasive wear. Alloying with higher amounts of chromium and molybdenum additionally leads to corrosion resistance. This makes them excellent candidates for use in fluid flow systems with a high abrasive load, e.g. due to liquids containing sand particles. In this study, two different cold work tool steels were examined with focus on wear attack that may occur in combination with flowing liquids. On one hand, hydroabrasive attack results from fluids containing abrasives such as sand. This was simulated using a slurry pot containing a mixture of water and SiO2 particles. On the other hand, changes in flow speed may cause formation of cavitation bubbles that lead to erosive wear of the surfaces of nearby materials. Thus, despite the fact that resistance to surface spalling (e.g. by cavitation) was not a primary goal of alloy development, both alloys were also investigated by means of ultrasonic cavitation testing. The aim was to detect the influences of alloying system, processing route, and heat treatment condition on the wear resistance. The results indicate a positive influence of retained austenite on cavitation resistance, whereas the exact opposite holds true in the case of hydroabrasion. The damage mechanisms were analyzed by means of optical as well as scanning electron microscopy with special focus on the role of carbides during cavitation. Further attention was paid to the manufacturing route by comparing commonly used hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS). The latter permits consolidation of pre-alloyed powders to near net-shape parts or to thick protective layers on lower alloyed substrates. Compared to HIP, SLPS promises lower manufacturing costs combined with comparable mechanical properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Cavitation erosion and hydroabrasion resistance of cold work tool steels produced by powder metallurgy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/cavitation-erosion-and-hydroabrasion-resistance-of-cold-work-tool-KJtZMzd3qy
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.wear.2014.12.016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Carbide-rich cold work tool steels produced by powder metallurgy are designed for applications that are exposed to heavy abrasive wear. Alloying with higher amounts of chromium and molybdenum additionally leads to corrosion resistance. This makes them excellent candidates for use in fluid flow systems with a high abrasive load, e.g. due to liquids containing sand particles. In this study, two different cold work tool steels were examined with focus on wear attack that may occur in combination with flowing liquids. On one hand, hydroabrasive attack results from fluids containing abrasives such as sand. This was simulated using a slurry pot containing a mixture of water and SiO2 particles. On the other hand, changes in flow speed may cause formation of cavitation bubbles that lead to erosive wear of the surfaces of nearby materials. Thus, despite the fact that resistance to surface spalling (e.g. by cavitation) was not a primary goal of alloy development, both alloys were also investigated by means of ultrasonic cavitation testing. The aim was to detect the influences of alloying system, processing route, and heat treatment condition on the wear resistance. The results indicate a positive influence of retained austenite on cavitation resistance, whereas the exact opposite holds true in the case of hydroabrasion. The damage mechanisms were analyzed by means of optical as well as scanning electron microscopy with special focus on the role of carbides during cavitation. Further attention was paid to the manufacturing route by comparing commonly used hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS). The latter permits consolidation of pre-alloyed powders to near net-shape parts or to thick protective layers on lower alloyed substrates. Compared to HIP, SLPS promises lower manufacturing costs combined with comparable mechanical properties.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: May 1, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off