Can contrast sensitivity functions in dyslexia be explained by inattention rather than a magnocellular deficit?

Can contrast sensitivity functions in dyslexia be explained by inattention rather than a... We examined whether data demonstrating contrast sensitivity losses in dyslexia that have been interpreted as evidence for loss of magnocellular visual function could be explained by inattention. Computer simulations of observers with poor concentration yielded inflated estimates of threshold that were a constant proportion of the true threshold across spatial frequencies. Data from many, but not all, studies supporting the magnocellular deficit theory are well described by these simulations, which predicted no interaction between observer group and spatial frequency. Some studies have reported significant interactions, but suffer from statistical deficiencies. This compromises some of the evidence for a magnocellular deficit in dyslexia derived from studies of threshold contrast sensitivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vision Research Elsevier

Can contrast sensitivity functions in dyslexia be explained by inattention rather than a magnocellular deficit?

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0042-6989
eISSN
1878-5646
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0042-6989(01)00176-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined whether data demonstrating contrast sensitivity losses in dyslexia that have been interpreted as evidence for loss of magnocellular visual function could be explained by inattention. Computer simulations of observers with poor concentration yielded inflated estimates of threshold that were a constant proportion of the true threshold across spatial frequencies. Data from many, but not all, studies supporting the magnocellular deficit theory are well described by these simulations, which predicted no interaction between observer group and spatial frequency. Some studies have reported significant interactions, but suffer from statistical deficiencies. This compromises some of the evidence for a magnocellular deficit in dyslexia derived from studies of threshold contrast sensitivity.

Journal

Vision ResearchElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2001

References

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