Breaking stereotypes through network analysis of the Chesapeake oyster community

Breaking stereotypes through network analysis of the Chesapeake oyster community Given the stories of Oyster Wars, competition for resources, and the large number of people involved in managing the oysters of the Chesapeake Bay, one might expect a fractured social network. Some management mandates require multiple stakeholder groups at the table, but these very rarely also mandate collaboration between the different types of oyster work going on: wild harvest, aquaculture, sanctuaries, and restoration. 140 people were surveyed via snowball sampling to document the social network of the Chesapeake oyster community. The survey questions used to construct the links between people in the network focused on the transfer of valued advice. Results show that the oyster community is well-connected across jurisdictional divides, type of oyster worked with, opinions of management, and across most career sectors. This shows that, despite persistent stereotypes to the contrary, members of the oyster community reach out for advice to a diverse cohort of colleagues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Policy Elsevier

Breaking stereotypes through network analysis of the Chesapeake oyster community

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0308-597X
eISSN
1872-9460
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.marpol.2017.12.023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Given the stories of Oyster Wars, competition for resources, and the large number of people involved in managing the oysters of the Chesapeake Bay, one might expect a fractured social network. Some management mandates require multiple stakeholder groups at the table, but these very rarely also mandate collaboration between the different types of oyster work going on: wild harvest, aquaculture, sanctuaries, and restoration. 140 people were surveyed via snowball sampling to document the social network of the Chesapeake oyster community. The survey questions used to construct the links between people in the network focused on the transfer of valued advice. Results show that the oyster community is well-connected across jurisdictional divides, type of oyster worked with, opinions of management, and across most career sectors. This shows that, despite persistent stereotypes to the contrary, members of the oyster community reach out for advice to a diverse cohort of colleagues.

Journal

Marine PolicyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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