Brain dynorphin and enkephalin systems in Fischer and Lewis rats: effects of morphine tolerance and withdrawal

Brain dynorphin and enkephalin systems in Fischer and Lewis rats: effects of morphine tolerance... Lewis rats are more likely to self-administer various drugs of abuse than Fischer rats. Here these two strains of rats were compared with regard to basal brain opioid peptide levels and the response to chronic morphine treatment and to naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Lewis rats had lower basal dynorphin peptides in the substantia nogra, striatum (not Leu-enkephalinArg 6 ) and VTA (not dynorphin B) and the pituitary gland. Leu-enkephalinArg 6 levels were also lower in these structures (with the exception of striatum which had higher levels) and in the nucleus accumbens. There were also strain differences in the response to chronic morphine treatment; in the nucleus accumbens, morphine treatment increased dynorphin A levels in Fischer rats only, in the ventral tegmental area effects were opposite with increased dynorphin levels in Fischer and decreased levels in Lewis rats, in the hippocampus dynorphin levels were markedly reduced in Lewis rats only. In Fischer rats, chronic morphine strongly affected peptide levels in the substantia nigra and striatum, whereas Lewis rats responded less in these areas. Leu-enkephalin, which derives from both prodynorphin and proenkephalin, and Met-enkephalin, which derives from proenkephalin, were effected by chronic morphine mainly in Fischer rats, increasing levels in most of the brain areas examined. The results in this study show (1) strain differences in basal levels of prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides, (2) the prodynorphin system to be differently influenced by morphine in Lewis rats than in Fischer rats and 3) the proenkephalin system to be influenced by chronic morphine in brain areas related to reward processes only in Fischer rats. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Elsevier

Brain dynorphin and enkephalin systems in Fischer and Lewis rats: effects of morphine tolerance and withdrawal

Brain Research, Volume 683 (1) – Jun 12, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved
ISSN
0006-8993
DOI
10.1016/0006-8993(95)00279-Y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lewis rats are more likely to self-administer various drugs of abuse than Fischer rats. Here these two strains of rats were compared with regard to basal brain opioid peptide levels and the response to chronic morphine treatment and to naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Lewis rats had lower basal dynorphin peptides in the substantia nogra, striatum (not Leu-enkephalinArg 6 ) and VTA (not dynorphin B) and the pituitary gland. Leu-enkephalinArg 6 levels were also lower in these structures (with the exception of striatum which had higher levels) and in the nucleus accumbens. There were also strain differences in the response to chronic morphine treatment; in the nucleus accumbens, morphine treatment increased dynorphin A levels in Fischer rats only, in the ventral tegmental area effects were opposite with increased dynorphin levels in Fischer and decreased levels in Lewis rats, in the hippocampus dynorphin levels were markedly reduced in Lewis rats only. In Fischer rats, chronic morphine strongly affected peptide levels in the substantia nigra and striatum, whereas Lewis rats responded less in these areas. Leu-enkephalin, which derives from both prodynorphin and proenkephalin, and Met-enkephalin, which derives from proenkephalin, were effected by chronic morphine mainly in Fischer rats, increasing levels in most of the brain areas examined. The results in this study show (1) strain differences in basal levels of prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides, (2) the prodynorphin system to be differently influenced by morphine in Lewis rats than in Fischer rats and 3) the proenkephalin system to be influenced by chronic morphine in brain areas related to reward processes only in Fischer rats.

Journal

Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Jun 12, 1995

References

  • Morphine and cocaine exert common chronic actions on tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic brain reward regions
    Beitner-Johnson, D.; Nestler, E.J.
  • Fischer and Lewis rat strains differ in basal levels of neurofilament proteins and their regulation by chronic morphine in the mesolimbic dopamine system
    Guitart, X.; Beitner-Johnson, D.; Marby, D.W.; Kosten, T.A.; Nestler, E.J.
  • Motivational properties of kappa and mu opioid receptor agonists studied with place and taste preference conditioning
    Mucha, R.F.; Herz, A.
  • The effects of opioid peptides on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens: an in vivo microdialysis study
    Spanagel, R.; Herz, A.; Shippenberg, T.S.

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