Brain catecholaminergic and tryptophan responses to restraint are attenuated by nitric oxide synthase inhibition

Brain catecholaminergic and tryptophan responses to restraint are attenuated by nitric oxide... Increases in the brain concentrations of tryptophan and in serotonin (5-HT) metabolism are commonly observed in animals under stress. Previous experiments indicated that the increase in brain tryptophan and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) observed in response to administration of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) were largely prevented by pretreatment with N-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). Therefore we tested whether the increases in tryptophan and 5-HT metabolism observed following restraint and footsthock were similarly affected. Mice were injected with L-NAME (30 mg/kg) or saline and restrained for 40 min. Restraint caused increases in concentrations of tryptophan and the catabolites of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and 5-HT in the medial prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem. The L-NAME pretreatment significantly attenuated, but did not prevent, the changes in tryptophan and catecholamine metabolism, with a very small effect on the increase in plasma corticosterone. When mice pretreated with L-NAME were subjected to 30 min footshock, the NOS inhibitor had no statistically significant effects on the increases in DA, NE and 5-HT metabolism, but tended to attenuate the increases in tryptophan. We interpret these results to indicate that NOS plays a relatively small role in the cerebral neurochemical responses to restraint and footshock, but the role in the restraint-induced changes was greater than that in the footshock-induced ones. The attenuation of the restraint-related effects on the catecholamines most probably reflects a contribution to the CNS responses from peripheral vascular changes which are likely to be limited by the inhibition of NOS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurochemistry International Elsevier

Brain catecholaminergic and tryptophan responses to restraint are attenuated by nitric oxide synthase inhibition

Neurochemistry International, Volume 33 (6) – Dec 1, 1998

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0197-0186
DOI
10.1016/S0197-0186(98)00064-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Increases in the brain concentrations of tryptophan and in serotonin (5-HT) metabolism are commonly observed in animals under stress. Previous experiments indicated that the increase in brain tryptophan and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) observed in response to administration of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) were largely prevented by pretreatment with N-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). Therefore we tested whether the increases in tryptophan and 5-HT metabolism observed following restraint and footsthock were similarly affected. Mice were injected with L-NAME (30 mg/kg) or saline and restrained for 40 min. Restraint caused increases in concentrations of tryptophan and the catabolites of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and 5-HT in the medial prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem. The L-NAME pretreatment significantly attenuated, but did not prevent, the changes in tryptophan and catecholamine metabolism, with a very small effect on the increase in plasma corticosterone. When mice pretreated with L-NAME were subjected to 30 min footshock, the NOS inhibitor had no statistically significant effects on the increases in DA, NE and 5-HT metabolism, but tended to attenuate the increases in tryptophan. We interpret these results to indicate that NOS plays a relatively small role in the cerebral neurochemical responses to restraint and footshock, but the role in the restraint-induced changes was greater than that in the footshock-induced ones. The attenuation of the restraint-related effects on the catecholamines most probably reflects a contribution to the CNS responses from peripheral vascular changes which are likely to be limited by the inhibition of NOS.

Journal

Neurochemistry InternationalElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1998

References

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