Body size, not phylogenetic relationship or residency, drives interspecific dominance in a little pocket mouse community

Body size, not phylogenetic relationship or residency, drives interspecific dominance in a little... The role of interspecific aggression in structuring ecological communities can be important to consider when reintroducing endangered species to areas of their historic range that are occupied by competitors. We sought to determine which species is the most serious interference competitor of the endangered Pacific pocket mouse, Perognathus longimembris pacificus, and more generally, whether interspecific aggression in rodents is predicted by body size, residency status or phylogenetic relatedness. We carried out simulated territory intrusion experiments between P. longimembris and four sympatric species of rodents (Chaetodipus fallax, Dipodomys simulans, Peromyscus maniculatus, Reithrodontomys megalotis) in a field enclosure in southern California sage scrub habitat. We found that body size asymmetries strongly predicted dominance, regardless of phylogenetic relatedness or the residency status of the individuals. The largest species, D. simulans, was the most dominant while the smallest species, R. megalotis, was the least dominant to P. longimembris. Furthermore, P. longimembris actively avoided encounters with all species, except R. megalotis. One management recommendation that follows from these results is that P. longimembris should not be reintroduced to areas with high densities of D. simulans until further research is carried out to assess the fitness consequences of the interactions. Our finding that the species least similar in body size is the most serious interference competitor of P. longimembris highlights an important distinction between interference and exploitative competition in rodent communities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Behaviour Elsevier

Body size, not phylogenetic relationship or residency, drives interspecific dominance in a little pocket mouse community

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/body-size-not-phylogenetic-relationship-or-residency-drives-EhaP85sdgZ
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour
ISSN
0003-3472
eISSN
1095-8282
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The role of interspecific aggression in structuring ecological communities can be important to consider when reintroducing endangered species to areas of their historic range that are occupied by competitors. We sought to determine which species is the most serious interference competitor of the endangered Pacific pocket mouse, Perognathus longimembris pacificus, and more generally, whether interspecific aggression in rodents is predicted by body size, residency status or phylogenetic relatedness. We carried out simulated territory intrusion experiments between P. longimembris and four sympatric species of rodents (Chaetodipus fallax, Dipodomys simulans, Peromyscus maniculatus, Reithrodontomys megalotis) in a field enclosure in southern California sage scrub habitat. We found that body size asymmetries strongly predicted dominance, regardless of phylogenetic relatedness or the residency status of the individuals. The largest species, D. simulans, was the most dominant while the smallest species, R. megalotis, was the least dominant to P. longimembris. Furthermore, P. longimembris actively avoided encounters with all species, except R. megalotis. One management recommendation that follows from these results is that P. longimembris should not be reintroduced to areas with high densities of D. simulans until further research is carried out to assess the fitness consequences of the interactions. Our finding that the species least similar in body size is the most serious interference competitor of P. longimembris highlights an important distinction between interference and exploitative competition in rodent communities.

Journal

Animal BehaviourElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off