Blockade of lithium chloride-induced conditioned place aversion as a test for antiemetic agents: Comparison of metoclopramide with combined extracts of Zingiber officinale and Ginkgo biloba

Blockade of lithium chloride-induced conditioned place aversion as a test for antiemetic agents:... The present study tests the hypothesis that the blockade of lithium chloride-induced conditioned place aversion might be a suitable model to assess antiemetic properties of drugs, especially in species that do not vomit, like rats. The effects of the known antiemetic compound metoclopramide were compared with those of zingicomb ® , a combination preparation of extracts of Ginkgo biloba and Zingiber officinale , also presumed to have antiemetic properties. Place conditioning was performed using a conventional three-compartment test procedure. On three successive conditioning trials, rats received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of lithium chloride (125 mg/kg) and were placed into the compartment that they had preferred over three baseline trials. During the test, rats treated with lithium chloride (LiCl) spent less time in the treatment compartment, indicative of a conditioned place aversion (CPA). In the first experiment, metoclopramide (MCP) was administered intragastrically (IG) in doses of 2 or 10 mg/kg 60 min prior to LiCl injection. The pretreatment with 10 mg/kg MCP blocked the LiCl-produced CPA, whereas injections of 2 mg/kg had no effect. In the second experiment, zingicomb was administered IG in a dose range of 10–100 mg/ kg 60 min prior to LiCl injection. The pretreatment with 50 and 100 mg/kg zingicomb attenuated the LiCl-produced CPA, whereas a dosage of 10 mg/kg had no effect. These findings suggest that LiCl-induced CPA is a viable procedure with which to assess the antiemetic properties of metoclopramide. Furthermore, the data confirm the hypothesis that the phytopharmacon zingicomb might have antiemetic properties that are comparable to those of metoclopramide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Elsevier

Blockade of lithium chloride-induced conditioned place aversion as a test for antiemetic agents: Comparison of metoclopramide with combined extracts of Zingiber officinale and Ginkgo biloba

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0091-3057
eISSN
1873-5177
D.O.I.
10.1016/0091-3057(95)00073-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study tests the hypothesis that the blockade of lithium chloride-induced conditioned place aversion might be a suitable model to assess antiemetic properties of drugs, especially in species that do not vomit, like rats. The effects of the known antiemetic compound metoclopramide were compared with those of zingicomb ® , a combination preparation of extracts of Ginkgo biloba and Zingiber officinale , also presumed to have antiemetic properties. Place conditioning was performed using a conventional three-compartment test procedure. On three successive conditioning trials, rats received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of lithium chloride (125 mg/kg) and were placed into the compartment that they had preferred over three baseline trials. During the test, rats treated with lithium chloride (LiCl) spent less time in the treatment compartment, indicative of a conditioned place aversion (CPA). In the first experiment, metoclopramide (MCP) was administered intragastrically (IG) in doses of 2 or 10 mg/kg 60 min prior to LiCl injection. The pretreatment with 10 mg/kg MCP blocked the LiCl-produced CPA, whereas injections of 2 mg/kg had no effect. In the second experiment, zingicomb was administered IG in a dose range of 10–100 mg/ kg 60 min prior to LiCl injection. The pretreatment with 50 and 100 mg/kg zingicomb attenuated the LiCl-produced CPA, whereas a dosage of 10 mg/kg had no effect. These findings suggest that LiCl-induced CPA is a viable procedure with which to assess the antiemetic properties of metoclopramide. Furthermore, the data confirm the hypothesis that the phytopharmacon zingicomb might have antiemetic properties that are comparable to those of metoclopramide.

Journal

Pharmacology Biochemistry and BehaviorElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1995

References

  • Acute effects of lithium on catecholamines, serotonin, and their major metabolites in discrete brain regions
    Gottberg, E.; Grondin, L.; Reader, T.A.
  • Activity of tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons and concentrations of serum prolactin in the rat following lithium administration
    Gudelsky, G.A.; Koenig, J.I.; Koyama, T.; Meltzer, H.Y.
  • 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists injected into the area postrema inhibit cisplatin-induced emesis in the ferret
    Higgins, G.A.; Kilpatrick, G.J.; Bunce, K.T.; Jones, B.J.; Tyers, M.B.
  • Motivational properties of kappa and mu opioid receptor agonists studied with place and taste preference conditioning
    Mucha, R.F.; Herz, A.
  • Reinforcing effects of peripherally administered substance P and its C-terminal sequence pGlu 6 -SP6-11 in the rat
    Oitzl, M.S.; Hasenöhrl, R.U.; Huston, J.P.

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