Biotechnology applied to grain legumes

Biotechnology applied to grain legumes Recent advances in grain legume biotechnology are reviewed. Emphasis is given on field testing and commercialization of transgenic grain legumes. The absence of variety-independent gene transfer methods for major agronomic species has, until now, limited the usefulness of recombinant DNA techniques to crop improvement programs. Direct DNA transfer techniques into organized and easily regenerable tissue provided the breakthrough to achieve effective and practical gene transfer into important leguminous species. In principle, we are now in the position to introduce any foreign gene into almost all major legumes, in some cases in a variety-independent fashion. This, however, can only be achieved routinely in few laboratories, all located in industrialized countries. A number of the more important of the leguminous crops, particularly those utilized for human consumption are important components of sustainable agricultural production systems in the developing world. We must bridge the gap between industrialized and developing countries before legume biotechnolgy can be utilized effectively for crop improvement, particularly in the developing world. Technology transfer becomes an important issue and links amongst corporate research organizations, academic institutions and international organizations need to be strengthened to avoid duplication of effort and to maximize efficient utilization of limited resources. In this chapter, advantages of the various gene delivery methods that were shown to be useful for specific crops, as well as limitations and problems associated with each crop and gene transfer method will be discussed. In addition, we will focus on specific biotechnology goals targeted for particular crops. Important oilseed and feed species as well as minor but equally important species for sustaining growing populations in developing countries are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Field Crops Research Elsevier

Biotechnology applied to grain legumes

Field Crops Research, Volume 53 (1) – Jul 1, 1997

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0378-4290
eISSN
1872-6852
DOI
10.1016/S0378-4290(97)00024-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent advances in grain legume biotechnology are reviewed. Emphasis is given on field testing and commercialization of transgenic grain legumes. The absence of variety-independent gene transfer methods for major agronomic species has, until now, limited the usefulness of recombinant DNA techniques to crop improvement programs. Direct DNA transfer techniques into organized and easily regenerable tissue provided the breakthrough to achieve effective and practical gene transfer into important leguminous species. In principle, we are now in the position to introduce any foreign gene into almost all major legumes, in some cases in a variety-independent fashion. This, however, can only be achieved routinely in few laboratories, all located in industrialized countries. A number of the more important of the leguminous crops, particularly those utilized for human consumption are important components of sustainable agricultural production systems in the developing world. We must bridge the gap between industrialized and developing countries before legume biotechnolgy can be utilized effectively for crop improvement, particularly in the developing world. Technology transfer becomes an important issue and links amongst corporate research organizations, academic institutions and international organizations need to be strengthened to avoid duplication of effort and to maximize efficient utilization of limited resources. In this chapter, advantages of the various gene delivery methods that were shown to be useful for specific crops, as well as limitations and problems associated with each crop and gene transfer method will be discussed. In addition, we will focus on specific biotechnology goals targeted for particular crops. Important oilseed and feed species as well as minor but equally important species for sustaining growing populations in developing countries are discussed.

Journal

Field Crops ResearchElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1997

References

  • Recovery of transgenic peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) plants from elite cultivars utilizing ACCELL technology
    Brar, G.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Vick, C.L.; Johnson, G.W.
  • Stable transformation of soybean callus by DNA-coated gold particles
    Christou, P.; McCabe, D.E.; Swain, W.F.
  • Transformation of peas
    Davies, D.R.; Hamilton, J.; Mullineaux, P.
  • Transformation and regeneration of French bean plants by the particle bombardment process
    Kim, J.W.; Minamikawa, T.
  • Genetic transformation, recovery and characterization of fertile soybean transgenic for a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis cryIAc gene
    Neal Stewart, C.; Adang, M.J.; All, N.J.; Boerma, H.R.; Cardineau, G.; Tucker, D.; Parrott, W.A.
  • Production of transgenic pea ( Pisum sativum L.) plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer
    Puonti-Kaerlas, J.; Eriksson, T.; Engstrom, P.
  • Inheritance of a bacterial hygromycin phosphotransferase gene in the progeny of primary transgenic pea plants
    Puonti-Kaerlas, J.; Eriksson, T.; Engstrom, P.
  • Transformation and regeneration of two cultivars of Pea ( Pisum sativum L.)
    Schroeder, H.; Schotz, A.; Wardley-Richardson, T.; Spencer, D.; Higgins, T.

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