Biodegradation of soap in anaerobic digesters and on sludge amended soils

Biodegradation of soap in anaerobic digesters and on sludge amended soils Water hardness plays an important role in waste water treatment processes. Calcium and/or magnesium salts of organic products are mostly precipitated due to their low solubility and they are less biodegradable than the equivalent sodium or potassium salts; more soluble in water. In the case of alkaline salts of fatty acids (soaps) reported in the present work, we have obtained a biodegradation of 80% average in anaerobic digesters, which is still significantly different from the expected value of 100% assumed theoretically for sodium or potassium derivatives. Soap biodegradation in anaerobic digester was studied both in laboratory scale equipment as well as on commercial scale digester of sewage treatment plants (STP). In the second case the biodegradation was further monitored on sludge amended soils using the sludge from STP's monitored in first step of the study. It was found that as a consequence of aerobic conditions prevalent in soil layer studied the remaining soap further biodegrades up to nearly 100% after 150 days. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Research Elsevier

Biodegradation of soap in anaerobic digesters and on sludge amended soils

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0043-1354
DOI
10.1016/S0043-1354(98)00199-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Water hardness plays an important role in waste water treatment processes. Calcium and/or magnesium salts of organic products are mostly precipitated due to their low solubility and they are less biodegradable than the equivalent sodium or potassium salts; more soluble in water. In the case of alkaline salts of fatty acids (soaps) reported in the present work, we have obtained a biodegradation of 80% average in anaerobic digesters, which is still significantly different from the expected value of 100% assumed theoretically for sodium or potassium derivatives. Soap biodegradation in anaerobic digester was studied both in laboratory scale equipment as well as on commercial scale digester of sewage treatment plants (STP). In the second case the biodegradation was further monitored on sludge amended soils using the sludge from STP's monitored in first step of the study. It was found that as a consequence of aerobic conditions prevalent in soil layer studied the remaining soap further biodegrades up to nearly 100% after 150 days.

Journal

Water ResearchElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1999

References

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