Biochemical stabilization of soil organic matter in straw-amended, anaerobic and aerobic soils

Biochemical stabilization of soil organic matter in straw-amended, anaerobic and aerobic soils Crop straw incorporation is a useful approach for increasing the quantity and changing the chemical composition of soil organic matter (SOM). This process is influenced by soil aeration. The present study investigated the stability of whole SOM, particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MinOM) fractions with wheat straw amendment under aerobic and anaerobic conditions over a 12-month incubation period. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical composition of whole SOM, POM and MinOM fractions. The decomposition rate of wheat straw was lower under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions (0.014 vs. 0.020day−1). Wheat straw incorporation increased the original soil organic carbon content (7.4g kg−1) under both aerobic (up to 10.2g·kg−1) and anaerobic (up to 10.3g·kg−1) conditions, but the content of mineral-associated organic carbon (MinOC) under aerobic condition (7.0g·kg−1) was significantly larger than that under anaerobic condition (4.9g·kg−1). The proportion of alkyl carbon (C) in SOM, POM and MinOM fractions was greater under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions, while the opposite was true for the proportion of O-alkyl C of SOM and POM and MinOM fractions. A/O-A indices (i.e., the ratio of alkyl C to O-alkyl C) of whole SOM, POM and MinOM were higher under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions. We conclude that wheat straw incorporation resulted in the enrichment of alkyl C in the POM and MinOM fractions under anaerobic conditions, and thus improved the stability of SOM. In this way, the decomposition of crop residue influenced SOM structural chemistry at the molecular level. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science of the Total Environment Elsevier

Biochemical stabilization of soil organic matter in straw-amended, anaerobic and aerobic soils

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/biochemical-stabilization-of-soil-organic-matter-in-straw-amended-ttQmcXhYup
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.293
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crop straw incorporation is a useful approach for increasing the quantity and changing the chemical composition of soil organic matter (SOM). This process is influenced by soil aeration. The present study investigated the stability of whole SOM, particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MinOM) fractions with wheat straw amendment under aerobic and anaerobic conditions over a 12-month incubation period. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical composition of whole SOM, POM and MinOM fractions. The decomposition rate of wheat straw was lower under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions (0.014 vs. 0.020day−1). Wheat straw incorporation increased the original soil organic carbon content (7.4g kg−1) under both aerobic (up to 10.2g·kg−1) and anaerobic (up to 10.3g·kg−1) conditions, but the content of mineral-associated organic carbon (MinOC) under aerobic condition (7.0g·kg−1) was significantly larger than that under anaerobic condition (4.9g·kg−1). The proportion of alkyl carbon (C) in SOM, POM and MinOM fractions was greater under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions, while the opposite was true for the proportion of O-alkyl C of SOM and POM and MinOM fractions. A/O-A indices (i.e., the ratio of alkyl C to O-alkyl C) of whole SOM, POM and MinOM were higher under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions. We conclude that wheat straw incorporation resulted in the enrichment of alkyl C in the POM and MinOM fractions under anaerobic conditions, and thus improved the stability of SOM. In this way, the decomposition of crop residue influenced SOM structural chemistry at the molecular level.

Journal

Science of the Total EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off