Bioactivity and protective effects of natural carotenoids

Bioactivity and protective effects of natural carotenoids Carotenoids comprise a class of natural fat-soluble pigments which are found in numerous fruits and vegetables. The consumption of a diet rich in carotenoids has been epidemiologically correlated with a lower risk for several diseases. The antioxidant activity of carotenoids and biochemical properties influencing signaling pathways have been discussed as basic mechanisms of prevention. Conflicting data from intervention studies with β-carotene to prevent cancers and cardiovascular disorders have challenged the concept. However, there is convincing evidence that carotenoids are important components of the antioxidant network. Photooxidative damage is suggested to be involved in the pathobiochemistry of several diseases affecting the skin and the eye, and carotenoids may protect light-exposed tissues. Lutein and zeaxanthin are the predominant carotenoids of the retina and are considered to act as photoprotectants preventing retinal degeneration. The unique distribution, localization and high levels of both carotenoids within the macula lutea as well as their physicochemical properties make them suitable candidates for photoprotection. β-Carotene is used as an oral sun protectant for the prevention of sunburn and has been shown to be effective either alone or in combination with other carotenoids or antioxidant vitamins. Protective effects are also achieved with a diet rich in lycopene. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease Elsevier

Bioactivity and protective effects of natural carotenoids

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0925-4439
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.bbadis.2004.12.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Carotenoids comprise a class of natural fat-soluble pigments which are found in numerous fruits and vegetables. The consumption of a diet rich in carotenoids has been epidemiologically correlated with a lower risk for several diseases. The antioxidant activity of carotenoids and biochemical properties influencing signaling pathways have been discussed as basic mechanisms of prevention. Conflicting data from intervention studies with β-carotene to prevent cancers and cardiovascular disorders have challenged the concept. However, there is convincing evidence that carotenoids are important components of the antioxidant network. Photooxidative damage is suggested to be involved in the pathobiochemistry of several diseases affecting the skin and the eye, and carotenoids may protect light-exposed tissues. Lutein and zeaxanthin are the predominant carotenoids of the retina and are considered to act as photoprotectants preventing retinal degeneration. The unique distribution, localization and high levels of both carotenoids within the macula lutea as well as their physicochemical properties make them suitable candidates for photoprotection. β-Carotene is used as an oral sun protectant for the prevention of sunburn and has been shown to be effective either alone or in combination with other carotenoids or antioxidant vitamins. Protective effects are also achieved with a diet rich in lycopene.

Journal

Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of DiseaseElsevier

Published: May 30, 2005

References

  • Separation of beta-carotene and lycopene geometrical isomers in biological samples
    Stahl, W.; Sundquist, A.R.; Hanusch, M.; Schwarz, W.; Sies, H.
  • Non-antioxidant properties of carotenoids
    Stahl, W.; Ale-Agha, N.; Polidori, M.C.
  • Biological activities of natural and synthetic carotenoids: induction of gap junctional communication and singlet oxygen quenching
    Stahl, W.; Nicolai, S.; Briviba, K.; Hanusch, M.; Broszeit, G.; Peters, M.; Martin, H.D.; Sies, H.
  • Antioxidants in human health and disease
    Halliwell, B.
  • The photophysics and photochemistry of the carotenoids
    Truscott, T.G.
  • Antioxidant and prooxidant properties of carotenoids
    Young, A.J.; Lowe, G.M.
  • Antioxidant activity of carotenoids
    Stahl, W.; Sies, H.
  • Enhanced protection of human cells against ultraviolet light by antioxidant combinations involving dietary carotenoids
    Böhm, F.; Edge, R.; Lange, L.; Truscott, T.G.
  • Antioxidant vitamins and risk of cardiovascular disease. Review of large-scale randomised trials
    Clarke, R.; Armitage, J.
  • Macular pigments lutein and zeaxanthin as blue light filters studied in liposomes
    Junghans, A.; Sies, H.; Stahl, W.
  • Photoimmunology, DNA repair and photocarcinogenesis
    Berneburg, M.; Krutmann, J.

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