Barriers to healthy eating amongst men: A qualitative analysis

Barriers to healthy eating amongst men: A qualitative analysis Currently, little is known about the meanings men attach to food or to the links between food and health. The burgeoning literature on men's health highlights forms of masculinity (e.g. risk-taking, invulnerability) as a factor (negatively) influencing men's health practices. The aim of this study was to provide an analysis of men's accounts of food and health using concepts pertaining to masculinity. We report on a qualitative analysis of a dataset comprising 24 interviews with UK men from a range of age and social class groups. Our findings suggest two principal barriers to healthy eating in men: cynicism about government health messages and a rejection of healthy food on grounds of poor taste and inability to satisfy. These findings are discussed in relation to masculine ideals such as rationality, autonomy and strength. The implications of our analysis for future research and men's health promotion policy are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Science & Medicine Elsevier

Barriers to healthy eating amongst men: A qualitative analysis

Social Science & Medicine, Volume 62 (2) – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0277-9536
DOI
10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.05.032
pmid
16011867
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Currently, little is known about the meanings men attach to food or to the links between food and health. The burgeoning literature on men's health highlights forms of masculinity (e.g. risk-taking, invulnerability) as a factor (negatively) influencing men's health practices. The aim of this study was to provide an analysis of men's accounts of food and health using concepts pertaining to masculinity. We report on a qualitative analysis of a dataset comprising 24 interviews with UK men from a range of age and social class groups. Our findings suggest two principal barriers to healthy eating in men: cynicism about government health messages and a rejection of healthy food on grounds of poor taste and inability to satisfy. These findings are discussed in relation to masculine ideals such as rationality, autonomy and strength. The implications of our analysis for future research and men's health promotion policy are discussed.

Journal

Social Science & MedicineElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2006

References

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