Barouh V. Berkovits, MSEE (1926–2012)

Barouh V. Berkovits, MSEE (1926–2012) Hamilton Editorial Commentary 10. Van Norstrand DW, Tester DJ, Ackerman MJ. Overrepresentation of the proarrhythmic, sudden death predisposing sodium channel polymorphism S1103Y in a population-based cohort of African-American sudden infant death syndrome. Heart Rhythm 2008;5:712­715. 11. van Rooij E, Quiat D, Johnson BA, et al. A family of microRNAs encoded by myosin genes governs myosin expression and muscle performance. Dev Cell 2009;17:662­673. 12. Boyett MR, Inada S, Yoo S, et al. Connexins in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Adv Cardiol 2006;42:175­197. 6. Deo R, Nalls MA, Avery CL, et al. Common genetic variation near the connexin 43 gene is associated with resting heart rate in African Americans: a genome-wide association study of 13,372 participants. Heart Rhythm 2013;10:401­408. 7. Dunham I, Kundaje A, Aldred SF, et al. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome. Nature 2012;489:57­74. 8. Ecker JR, Bickmore WA, Barroso I, Pritchard JK, Gilad Y, Segal E. Genomics: ENCODE explained. Nature 2012;489:52­55. 9. Hamilton RM. Genetic testing for mutations or polymorphisms in sudden infant death syndrome: "an argument that cuts both ways". Heart Rhythm 2008;5: 716­718. ´ Samuel Levy, MD, Victor A. Medina-Ravell, MD, Agustin Castellanos Jr, MD after a number of successful canine experiments. Together, they developed the monophasic waveform. The term "cardioversion" used to designate an R-wavesynchronized DC shock to terminate arrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, most commonly atrial fibrillation, dates from that period. The DC defibrillator was the first tool that could terminate safely sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Berkovits invented and patented the first demand pacemaker capable of sensing the R wave. Particularly fruitful was his cooperation with Dr Agustin Castellanos Jr and Dr Louis Lemberg from the University of Miami, where the demand pacemaker was first implanted. As a result of this cooperation, atrioventricular sequential pacing confirmed the benefit of pacing the right atrium and, in the case of atrioventricular block, both chambers. Berkovits devised other methods of pacing for termination of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardias. For his contributions to the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, Berkovits received the "Distinguished Scientist Award" in 1982 by the Heart Rhythm Society. Berkovits was impressive for his knowledge in medicine and cardiology and for his attention to the needs of cardiologists, and he was driven by the knowledge that his work helped patients. His humbleness and his availability attracted many friends. We present our condolences to his family: to his wife, Channah; and to his children, Naomi, Nathan, and Rachel, and their families. Berkovits will be remembered particularly by those who were privileged to have known him. Barouh Vojtec Berkovits passed away on October 23, 2012, at the age of 86 years. Berkovits was a master of science and an electrical engineer. Born in 1926 in Lucenec, Czechoslovakia (today Czech Republic), he worked as a technician behind the enemy lines. He escaped the Holocaust, but his parents and sister Eva perished in Auschwitz, Poland. In 1949 he immigrated to Israel and in 1956 to the United States. He became Senior Engineer at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and then Director of Cardiovascular Research of American Optical Corporation; he patented a number of important devices and tools used commonly today by cardiologists. He joined Medtronic Inc in 1975, where he worked until his retirement in 1993. Among his contributions is the direct current (DC) defibrillator, which he proposed to Dr Bernard Lown http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Heart Rhythm Elsevier

Barouh V. Berkovits, MSEE (1926–2012)

Heart Rhythm , Volume 10 (3) – Mar 1, 2013
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Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
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1547-5271
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1556-3871
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.hrthm.2013.01.010
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Abstract

Hamilton Editorial Commentary 10. Van Norstrand DW, Tester DJ, Ackerman MJ. Overrepresentation of the proarrhythmic, sudden death predisposing sodium channel polymorphism S1103Y in a population-based cohort of African-American sudden infant death syndrome. Heart Rhythm 2008;5:712­715. 11. van Rooij E, Quiat D, Johnson BA, et al. A family of microRNAs encoded by myosin genes governs myosin expression and muscle performance. Dev Cell 2009;17:662­673. 12. Boyett MR, Inada S, Yoo S, et al. Connexins in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Adv Cardiol 2006;42:175­197. 6. Deo R, Nalls MA, Avery CL, et al. Common genetic variation near the connexin 43 gene is associated with resting heart rate in African Americans: a genome-wide association study of 13,372 participants. Heart Rhythm 2013;10:401­408. 7. Dunham I, Kundaje A, Aldred SF, et al. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome. Nature 2012;489:57­74. 8. Ecker JR, Bickmore WA, Barroso I, Pritchard JK, Gilad Y, Segal E. Genomics: ENCODE explained. Nature 2012;489:52­55. 9. Hamilton RM. Genetic testing for mutations or polymorphisms in sudden infant death syndrome: "an argument that cuts both ways". Heart Rhythm 2008;5: 716­718. ´ Samuel Levy, MD, Victor A. Medina-Ravell, MD, Agustin Castellanos Jr, MD after a number of successful canine experiments. Together, they developed the monophasic waveform. The term "cardioversion" used to designate an R-wavesynchronized DC shock to terminate arrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, most commonly atrial fibrillation, dates from that period. The DC defibrillator was the first tool that could terminate safely sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Berkovits invented and patented the first demand pacemaker capable of sensing the R wave. Particularly fruitful was his cooperation with Dr Agustin Castellanos Jr and Dr Louis Lemberg from the University of Miami, where the demand pacemaker was first implanted. As a result of this cooperation, atrioventricular sequential pacing confirmed the benefit of pacing the right atrium and, in the case of atrioventricular block, both chambers. Berkovits devised other methods of pacing for termination of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardias. For his contributions to the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, Berkovits received the "Distinguished Scientist Award" in 1982 by the Heart Rhythm Society. Berkovits was impressive for his knowledge in medicine and cardiology and for his attention to the needs of cardiologists, and he was driven by the knowledge that his work helped patients. His humbleness and his availability attracted many friends. We present our condolences to his family: to his wife, Channah; and to his children, Naomi, Nathan, and Rachel, and their families. Berkovits will be remembered particularly by those who were privileged to have known him. Barouh Vojtec Berkovits passed away on October 23, 2012, at the age of 86 years. Berkovits was a master of science and an electrical engineer. Born in 1926 in Lucenec, Czechoslovakia (today Czech Republic), he worked as a technician behind the enemy lines. He escaped the Holocaust, but his parents and sister Eva perished in Auschwitz, Poland. In 1949 he immigrated to Israel and in 1956 to the United States. He became Senior Engineer at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and then Director of Cardiovascular Research of American Optical Corporation; he patented a number of important devices and tools used commonly today by cardiologists. He joined Medtronic Inc in 1975, where he worked until his retirement in 1993. Among his contributions is the direct current (DC) defibrillator, which he proposed to Dr Bernard Lown

Journal

Heart RhythmElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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