Autonomous and nonautonomous functions for Hox/Pbx in branchiomotor neuron development

Autonomous and nonautonomous functions for Hox/Pbx in branchiomotor neuron development The vertebrate branchiomotor neurons are organized in a pattern that corresponds with the segments, or rhombomeres, of the developing hindbrain and have identities and behaviors associated with their position along the anterior/posterior axis. These neurons undergo characteristic migrations in the hindbrain and project from stereotyped exit points. We show that lazarus/pbx4, which encodes an essential Hox DNA-binding partner in zebrafish, is required for facial (VIIth cranial nerve) motor neuron migration and for axon pathfinding of trigeminal (Vth cranial nerve) motor axons. We show that lzr/pbx4 is required for Hox paralog group 1 and 2 function, suggesting that Pbx interacts with these proteins. Consistent with this, lzr/pbx4 interacts genetically with hoxb1a to control facial motor neuron migration. Using genetic mosaic analysis, we show that lzr/pbx4 and hoxb1a are primarily required cell-autonomously within the facial motor neurons; however, analysis of a subtle non-cell-autonomous effect indicates that facial motor neuron migration is promoted by interactions amongst the migrating neurons. At the same time, lzr/pbx4 is required non-cell-autonomously to control the pathfinding of trigeminal motor axons. Thus, Pbx/Hox can function both cell-autonomously and non-cell-autonomously to direct different aspects of hindbrain motor neuron behavior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Biology Elsevier

Autonomous and nonautonomous functions for Hox/Pbx in branchiomotor neuron development

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA)
ISSN
0012-1606
eISSN
1095-564X
DOI
10.1016/S0012-1606(02)00018-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The vertebrate branchiomotor neurons are organized in a pattern that corresponds with the segments, or rhombomeres, of the developing hindbrain and have identities and behaviors associated with their position along the anterior/posterior axis. These neurons undergo characteristic migrations in the hindbrain and project from stereotyped exit points. We show that lazarus/pbx4, which encodes an essential Hox DNA-binding partner in zebrafish, is required for facial (VIIth cranial nerve) motor neuron migration and for axon pathfinding of trigeminal (Vth cranial nerve) motor axons. We show that lzr/pbx4 is required for Hox paralog group 1 and 2 function, suggesting that Pbx interacts with these proteins. Consistent with this, lzr/pbx4 interacts genetically with hoxb1a to control facial motor neuron migration. Using genetic mosaic analysis, we show that lzr/pbx4 and hoxb1a are primarily required cell-autonomously within the facial motor neurons; however, analysis of a subtle non-cell-autonomous effect indicates that facial motor neuron migration is promoted by interactions amongst the migrating neurons. At the same time, lzr/pbx4 is required non-cell-autonomously to control the pathfinding of trigeminal motor axons. Thus, Pbx/Hox can function both cell-autonomously and non-cell-autonomously to direct different aspects of hindbrain motor neuron behavior.

Journal

Developmental BiologyElsevier

Published: Jan 15, 2003

References

  • The zebrafish trilobite gene is essential for tangential migration of branchiomotor neurons
    Bingham, S.; Higashijima, S.; Okamoto, H.; Chandrasekhar, A.
  • Zebrafish Hox paralogue group 2 genes function redundantly as selector genes to pattern the second pharyngeal arch
    Hunter, M.P.and Price V.P.
  • Stages of embryonic zebrafish
    Kimmel, C.B.; Ballard, W.W.; Kimmel, S.R.; Ullmann, B.; Schilling, T.F.
  • A novel pbx family member expressed during early zebrafish embryogenesis forms trimeric complexes with Meis3 and Hoxb1b
    Vlachakis, N.; Ellstrom, D.R.; Sagerstrom, C.G.
  • Establishment of hindbrain segmental identity requires signalling by FGF3 and FGF8
    Walshe, J.; Maroon, H.; McGonnell, I.M.; Dickson, C.; Mason, I.
  • Ectopic expression of hoxb2 after retinoic acid treatment or mRNA injection
    Yan, Y.L.; Jowett, T.; Postlethwait, J.H.

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