Australia's tree-kangaroos: current issues in their conservation

Australia's tree-kangaroos: current issues in their conservation Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo ( Dendrolagus lumholtzi ) and Bennett's tree-kangaroo ( Dendrolagus bennettianus ) are the two largest arboreal folivores in Australia and are both restricted to the tropical rainforests and adjacent forest communities in North Queensland. Both species display cryptic and secretive behaviour, and consequently are poorly studied. Bennett's tree-kangaroos are found within a relatively small area (∼2000 km 2 ) of the Wet Tropics, however the majority of this area is within a protected `World Heritage Area', and consequently the conservation status of this species is considered moderately safe despite its rarity. The overall distribution of Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo, which is also considered rare, covers a larger area (∼5500 km 2 ), which also has considerable overlap with the `World Heritage Area' (WHA). Despite this, the species appears to maintain its highest densities in forest outside the WHA conservation zone. Lumholtz's tree-kangaroos are more commonly found in the fragmented forests on the Atherton Tablelands, and are often associated with remnant and secondary rainforests on basalt soils. These forest communities are considered rare and are poorly represented in existing reserves. This paper considers the conservation issues for both of these species, but focuses particularly on Lumholtz's tree-kangaroos for which more data is available. Issues discussed include the loss of habitat outside the World Heritage Area, road deaths of animals, predation by canids, traditional hunting, and fecundity and recruitment. Measures for the conservation of these species are suggested, including measures for the retention of habitat on private land, public education, translocation and captive breeding. The applicability of research on Australian tree-kangaroos to the conservation of the eight species of tree-kangaroos in Papua New Guinea is also considered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Australia's tree-kangaroos: current issues in their conservation

Biological Conservation, Volume 87 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0006-3207(98)00052-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo ( Dendrolagus lumholtzi ) and Bennett's tree-kangaroo ( Dendrolagus bennettianus ) are the two largest arboreal folivores in Australia and are both restricted to the tropical rainforests and adjacent forest communities in North Queensland. Both species display cryptic and secretive behaviour, and consequently are poorly studied. Bennett's tree-kangaroos are found within a relatively small area (∼2000 km 2 ) of the Wet Tropics, however the majority of this area is within a protected `World Heritage Area', and consequently the conservation status of this species is considered moderately safe despite its rarity. The overall distribution of Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo, which is also considered rare, covers a larger area (∼5500 km 2 ), which also has considerable overlap with the `World Heritage Area' (WHA). Despite this, the species appears to maintain its highest densities in forest outside the WHA conservation zone. Lumholtz's tree-kangaroos are more commonly found in the fragmented forests on the Atherton Tablelands, and are often associated with remnant and secondary rainforests on basalt soils. These forest communities are considered rare and are poorly represented in existing reserves. This paper considers the conservation issues for both of these species, but focuses particularly on Lumholtz's tree-kangaroos for which more data is available. Issues discussed include the loss of habitat outside the World Heritage Area, road deaths of animals, predation by canids, traditional hunting, and fecundity and recruitment. Measures for the conservation of these species are suggested, including measures for the retention of habitat on private land, public education, translocation and captive breeding. The applicability of research on Australian tree-kangaroos to the conservation of the eight species of tree-kangaroos in Papua New Guinea is also considered.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1999

References

  • Aboriginal fire regimes in Queensland, Australia: analysis of the explorers' record
    Fensham, R.J.
  • A new tree kangaroo ( Dendrolagus : Marsupialia) from Irian Jaya, Indonesia, with notes on ethnography and the evolution of tree kangaroos
    Flannery, T.F.; Boeadi; Szalay, A.L.
  • Evidence of a Holocene and continuing recent expansion of lowland rain forest in humid, tropical North Queensland
    Hopkins, M.S.; Head, J.; Ash, J.A.; Hewett, R.K.; Graham, A.W.
  • Limitations of captive breeding in endangered species recovery
    Snyder, N.F.R.; Derrickson, S.R.; Beissinger, S.R.; Wiley, J.W.; Smith, T.B.; Toone, W.D.; Miller, B.

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