Astrocytic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters mediate guanidinoacetate transport in rat brain

Astrocytic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters mediate guanidinoacetate transport in rat brain Guanidinoacetate (GAA) is a biosynthetic precursor of creatine, which plays a critical role in homeostasis of high-energy phosphates in the brain, but cerebral accumulation of GAA leads to neurological complications, such as epilepsy and seizures. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the contribution of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport systems to GAA transport in astrocytes by means of uptake studies in rat brain slices, primary astrocyte cultures and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human GABA transporters (GATs). GAA uptake by rat brain slices was Na+- and Cl−-dependent, and GABA-sensitive. The inhibitory effect of GABA, a common substrate of GATs, on GAA uptake by the brain slices was similar to that of β-alanine, a selective substrate of GAT2/Slc6a13, GAT3/Slc6a11, and taurine transporter (TauT)/Slc6a6. Taurine, a high-affinity substrate of TauT/Slc6a6, exhibited a lesser inhibitory effect. In contrast, betaine, a substrate of betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1)/Slc6a12, and creatine, a substrate of creatine transporter (CRT)/Slc6a8, had little inhibitory effect. A similar inhibition profile was observed in primary-cultured astrocytes. CHO cells expressing human GAT2/SLC6A13, GAT3/SLC6A11 and BGT1/SLC6A12 exhibited GAA transport, whereas CHO cells expressing GAT1/SLC6A1 did not. The Michaelis-Menten values in CHO cells expressing GAT2/SLC6A13 and GAT3/SLC6A11 were similar to those in primary-cultured astrocytes. Overall, our results suggest that astrocytic GAT2/Slc6a13 and GAT3/Slc6a11 play major roles in GAA uptake as regulatory mechanisms of GAA in rat brain, while TauT/Slc6a6, BGT1/Slc6a12, and CRT/Slc6a8 make relatively small contributions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurochemistry International Elsevier

Astrocytic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters mediate guanidinoacetate transport in rat brain

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/astrocytic-aminobutyric-acid-gaba-transporters-mediate-NkmlamQpEf
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0197-0186
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.neuint.2017.11.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Guanidinoacetate (GAA) is a biosynthetic precursor of creatine, which plays a critical role in homeostasis of high-energy phosphates in the brain, but cerebral accumulation of GAA leads to neurological complications, such as epilepsy and seizures. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the contribution of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport systems to GAA transport in astrocytes by means of uptake studies in rat brain slices, primary astrocyte cultures and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human GABA transporters (GATs). GAA uptake by rat brain slices was Na+- and Cl−-dependent, and GABA-sensitive. The inhibitory effect of GABA, a common substrate of GATs, on GAA uptake by the brain slices was similar to that of β-alanine, a selective substrate of GAT2/Slc6a13, GAT3/Slc6a11, and taurine transporter (TauT)/Slc6a6. Taurine, a high-affinity substrate of TauT/Slc6a6, exhibited a lesser inhibitory effect. In contrast, betaine, a substrate of betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1)/Slc6a12, and creatine, a substrate of creatine transporter (CRT)/Slc6a8, had little inhibitory effect. A similar inhibition profile was observed in primary-cultured astrocytes. CHO cells expressing human GAT2/SLC6A13, GAT3/SLC6A11 and BGT1/SLC6A12 exhibited GAA transport, whereas CHO cells expressing GAT1/SLC6A1 did not. The Michaelis-Menten values in CHO cells expressing GAT2/SLC6A13 and GAT3/SLC6A11 were similar to those in primary-cultured astrocytes. Overall, our results suggest that astrocytic GAT2/Slc6a13 and GAT3/Slc6a11 play major roles in GAA uptake as regulatory mechanisms of GAA in rat brain, while TauT/Slc6a6, BGT1/Slc6a12, and CRT/Slc6a8 make relatively small contributions.

Journal

Neurochemistry InternationalElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off