Assessment of tomato soluble solids content and pH by spatially-resolved and conventional Vis/NIR spectroscopy

Assessment of tomato soluble solids content and pH by spatially-resolved and conventional Vis/NIR... Spatially-resolved spectroscopy (SRS) enables better interrogation of tissue properties at different depths, and it thus has the potential for enhancing quality assessment of horticultural products like tomato, which are heterogeneous in structure and chemical composition. This research was aimed at assessing quality of tomato fruit by using a newly developed SRS system with 30 detection optic fibers covering the wavelength range of 550–1650 nm and comparing its performance with two conventional single-point (SP) spectroscopic instruments covering the visible and shortwave near-infrared (Vis/SWNIR) (400–1100 nm) and near-infrared (NIR) (900–1300 nm) regions, respectively. Spatially-resolved (SR) spectra and SP interactance spectra were acquired for 600 ‘Sun Bright’ tomato fruit. Partial least squares (PLS) models for individual SR spectra and their combinations and for SP Vis/SWNIR and NIR spectra were developed for prediction of soluble solids content (SSC) and pH. Results showed that SSC and pH predictions by SRS varied depending on the light source-detector distance, with the correlation coefficient of prediction (rp) ranging 0.608–0.791 and 0.688–0.800, respectively. Combinations of two or more SR spectra resulted in better, more consistent SSC and pH predictions. SR predictions of pH (rp = 0.819) were better than for SP Vis/SWNIR (rp = 0.743) and NIR (rp = 0.741) predictions, whereas SR predictions of SSC (rp = 0.800) were comparable to SP NIR predictions (rp = 0.810) but better than SP Vis/SWNIR predictions (rp = 0.729). This research showed that owning to its ability of acquiring spatially-resolved spectral information, the SRS technique has advantages over conventional SP spectroscopy for enhancing quality assessment of tomatoes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Engineering Elsevier

Assessment of tomato soluble solids content and pH by spatially-resolved and conventional Vis/NIR spectroscopy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/assessment-of-tomato-soluble-solids-content-and-ph-by-spatially-a0dMHuL8uy
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0260-8774
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2018.05.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatially-resolved spectroscopy (SRS) enables better interrogation of tissue properties at different depths, and it thus has the potential for enhancing quality assessment of horticultural products like tomato, which are heterogeneous in structure and chemical composition. This research was aimed at assessing quality of tomato fruit by using a newly developed SRS system with 30 detection optic fibers covering the wavelength range of 550–1650 nm and comparing its performance with two conventional single-point (SP) spectroscopic instruments covering the visible and shortwave near-infrared (Vis/SWNIR) (400–1100 nm) and near-infrared (NIR) (900–1300 nm) regions, respectively. Spatially-resolved (SR) spectra and SP interactance spectra were acquired for 600 ‘Sun Bright’ tomato fruit. Partial least squares (PLS) models for individual SR spectra and their combinations and for SP Vis/SWNIR and NIR spectra were developed for prediction of soluble solids content (SSC) and pH. Results showed that SSC and pH predictions by SRS varied depending on the light source-detector distance, with the correlation coefficient of prediction (rp) ranging 0.608–0.791 and 0.688–0.800, respectively. Combinations of two or more SR spectra resulted in better, more consistent SSC and pH predictions. SR predictions of pH (rp = 0.819) were better than for SP Vis/SWNIR (rp = 0.743) and NIR (rp = 0.741) predictions, whereas SR predictions of SSC (rp = 0.800) were comparable to SP NIR predictions (rp = 0.810) but better than SP Vis/SWNIR predictions (rp = 0.729). This research showed that owning to its ability of acquiring spatially-resolved spectral information, the SRS technique has advantages over conventional SP spectroscopy for enhancing quality assessment of tomatoes.

Journal

Journal of Food EngineeringElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off