Assessing visitors' thermal comfort in historic museum buildings: Results from a Post-Occupancy Evaluation on a case study

Assessing visitors' thermal comfort in historic museum buildings: Results from a Post-Occupancy... Adaptive reuse of historic buildings as museums is an effective strategy for retaining heritage architectures while achieving environmental sustainability objectives. Building adaptation, retrofitting and preserving optimal environments for artwork and exhibit preservation are inherently complex, multifaceted tasks. However, indoor microclimates do not only affect collections; occupants and visitors must also be considered. The aim of this research is to explore whether artwork preservation constraints in reused historic building affect patrons. The authors thereby promote a more comprehensive approach, combining the objectives of exhibit conservation, preservation of heritage buildings and adequate indoor conditions, particularly thermal comfort. Data was gathered using the Post-Occupancy Evaluation process applied to a case study where a combination of microclimate monitoring and questionnaire surveys was carried out over a 12-month period. Results demonstrate that: i) the existing microclimate did not always provide visitors with adequate thermal conditions, showing dissatisfaction during the cooling season (July–September), with average TSV values ranging from −1.03 to −1.13; ii) TSV and PMV values were significantly divergent throughout the year, with TSV mainly included within the (−1, 0, +1) band and PMV mainly within the (0, −2) band; and iii) questionnaires show that visitor choice of clothing is made according to outdoor conditions, with some gender-related variations in the clo level (higher for women), not ensuring thermal comfort inside the museum during the warm season. Results of this research highlight the limitations of Fanger's model when applied to such typology of buildings, emphasising the need for more research in this field. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building and Environment Elsevier

Assessing visitors' thermal comfort in historic museum buildings: Results from a Post-Occupancy Evaluation on a case study

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1323
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.02.003
Publisher site
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Abstract

Adaptive reuse of historic buildings as museums is an effective strategy for retaining heritage architectures while achieving environmental sustainability objectives. Building adaptation, retrofitting and preserving optimal environments for artwork and exhibit preservation are inherently complex, multifaceted tasks. However, indoor microclimates do not only affect collections; occupants and visitors must also be considered. The aim of this research is to explore whether artwork preservation constraints in reused historic building affect patrons. The authors thereby promote a more comprehensive approach, combining the objectives of exhibit conservation, preservation of heritage buildings and adequate indoor conditions, particularly thermal comfort. Data was gathered using the Post-Occupancy Evaluation process applied to a case study where a combination of microclimate monitoring and questionnaire surveys was carried out over a 12-month period. Results demonstrate that: i) the existing microclimate did not always provide visitors with adequate thermal conditions, showing dissatisfaction during the cooling season (July–September), with average TSV values ranging from −1.03 to −1.13; ii) TSV and PMV values were significantly divergent throughout the year, with TSV mainly included within the (−1, 0, +1) band and PMV mainly within the (0, −2) band; and iii) questionnaires show that visitor choice of clothing is made according to outdoor conditions, with some gender-related variations in the clo level (higher for women), not ensuring thermal comfort inside the museum during the warm season. Results of this research highlight the limitations of Fanger's model when applied to such typology of buildings, emphasising the need for more research in this field.

Journal

Building and EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Mar 15, 2018

References

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