Are women less risk averse than men? The effect of impending death on risk-taking behavior

Are women less risk averse than men? The effect of impending death on risk-taking behavior The purpose of this article is to present empirical tests of the hypothesis that women are more risk averse than men in the case of impending death. More precisely, we compare male and female attitudes toward risk of health degradation and in the extreme case of risk of life loss. From multivariate analysis, we find that women infected by the HIV virus exhibit less risk taking than men in their contestation behavior. However, other factors including age of the individual at infection, health state (HIV+ vs. full-blown AIDS), medical state (hemophiliac or not), and nationality influence risk-taking behavior. We analyze the impact of these independent variables in risk taking when the sex variable is controlled in the regression equation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution and Human Behavior Elsevier

Are women less risk averse than men? The effect of impending death on risk-taking behavior

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1090-5138
DOI
10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2008.05.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to present empirical tests of the hypothesis that women are more risk averse than men in the case of impending death. More precisely, we compare male and female attitudes toward risk of health degradation and in the extreme case of risk of life loss. From multivariate analysis, we find that women infected by the HIV virus exhibit less risk taking than men in their contestation behavior. However, other factors including age of the individual at infection, health state (HIV+ vs. full-blown AIDS), medical state (hemophiliac or not), and nationality influence risk-taking behavior. We analyze the impact of these independent variables in risk taking when the sex variable is controlled in the regression equation.

Journal

Evolution and Human BehaviorElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2008

References

  • Sex differences and statistical stereotyping in attitudes toward financial risk
    Eeckel, C.C.; Grossman, P.J.
  • Smoking, seat belts and other risky consumer decisions: Differences by gender and race
    Hersch, J.
  • Are women more risk averse?
    Jianakoplos, N.A.; Bernasek, A.

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