Are there fitness costs of adaptive pyrethroid resistance in the amphipod, Hyalella azteca?

Are there fitness costs of adaptive pyrethroid resistance in the amphipod, Hyalella azteca? Pyrethroid-resistant Hyalella azteca with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations have been identified at multiple locations throughout California. In December 2013, H. azteca were collected from Mosher Slough in Stockton, CA, USA, a site with reported pyrethroid (primarily bifenthrin and cyfluthrin) sediment concentrations approximately twice the 10-d LC50 for laboratory-cultured H. azteca. These H. azteca were shipped to Southern Illinois University Carbondale and have been maintained in pyrethroid-free culture since collection. Even after 22 months in culture, resistant animals had approximately 53 times higher tolerance to permethrin than non-resistant laboratory-cultured H. azteca. Resistant animals held in culture also lacked the wild-type allele at the L925 locus, and had non-synonymous substitutions that resulted in either a leucine-isoleucine or leucine-valine substitution. Additionally, animals collected from the same site nearly three years later were again resistant to the pyrethroid permethrin. When resistant animals were compared to non-resistant animals, they showed lower reproductive capacity, lower upper thermal tolerance, and the data suggested greater sensitivity to, 4, 4′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), copper (II) sulfate, and sodium chloride. Further testing of the greater heat and sodium chloride sensitivity of the resistant animals showed these effects to be unrelated to clade association. Fitness costs associated with resistance to pyrethroids are well documented in pest species (including mosquitoes, peach-potato aphids, and codling moths) and we believe that H. azteca collected from Mosher Slough also have fitness costs associated with the developed resistance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Are there fitness costs of adaptive pyrethroid resistance in the amphipod, Hyalella azteca?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/are-there-fitness-costs-of-adaptive-pyrethroid-resistance-in-the-ElJdGmDWmY
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pyrethroid-resistant Hyalella azteca with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations have been identified at multiple locations throughout California. In December 2013, H. azteca were collected from Mosher Slough in Stockton, CA, USA, a site with reported pyrethroid (primarily bifenthrin and cyfluthrin) sediment concentrations approximately twice the 10-d LC50 for laboratory-cultured H. azteca. These H. azteca were shipped to Southern Illinois University Carbondale and have been maintained in pyrethroid-free culture since collection. Even after 22 months in culture, resistant animals had approximately 53 times higher tolerance to permethrin than non-resistant laboratory-cultured H. azteca. Resistant animals held in culture also lacked the wild-type allele at the L925 locus, and had non-synonymous substitutions that resulted in either a leucine-isoleucine or leucine-valine substitution. Additionally, animals collected from the same site nearly three years later were again resistant to the pyrethroid permethrin. When resistant animals were compared to non-resistant animals, they showed lower reproductive capacity, lower upper thermal tolerance, and the data suggested greater sensitivity to, 4, 4′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), copper (II) sulfate, and sodium chloride. Further testing of the greater heat and sodium chloride sensitivity of the resistant animals showed these effects to be unrelated to clade association. Fitness costs associated with resistance to pyrethroids are well documented in pest species (including mosquitoes, peach-potato aphids, and codling moths) and we believe that H. azteca collected from Mosher Slough also have fitness costs associated with the developed resistance.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off