Are folates, carotenoids and vitamin C affected by cooking? Four domestic procedures are compared on a large diversity of frozen vegetables

Are folates, carotenoids and vitamin C affected by cooking? Four domestic procedures are compared... 1 Introduction</h5> Vegetables are a class of plant foods that are eaten as fresh, canned, frozen and cooked vegetables. Beyond its effect on texture and taste, cooking also changes the nutritional properties of vegetables. Main phytochemicals such as vitamin C, folates (vitamin B9) and provitamin A carotenoids (β, α and γ-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin) are present in vegetables. Among non-vitaminic compounds, lutein ( Calvo, 2005 ) and lycopene ( Singh & Goyal, 2008 ) are also mostly provided in the diet by green leafy vegetables and tomato, respectively. Lutein plays a major role against macula degeneration ( Granado, Olmedilla, & Blanco, 2003 ), while lycopene has proven effects in prevention of prostate cancer ( Bramley, 2000 ).</P>The effect of domestic cooking on phytochemicals (carotenoids non-vitamin C, polyphenols, chlorophylls) and on micronutrients (vitamins) and has been already studied on vegetables ( Bernhardt & Schlich, 2006; Gebczynski & Lisiewska, 2006; Mazzeo et al., 2011; Miglio, Chiavaro, Visconti, Fogliano, & Pellegrini, 2008; Pellegrini et al., 2010; Sultana, Anwar, & Iqbal, 2008; Turkmen, Sari, & Velioglu, 2005; Volden, Borge, Hansen, Wicklund, & Bengtsson, 2009 ). Different procedures have been tested such as boiling, microwave cooking, steaming, pressure steaming, frying and stewing. Their effects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png LWT - Food Science and Technology Elsevier

Are folates, carotenoids and vitamin C affected by cooking? Four domestic procedures are compared on a large diversity of frozen vegetables

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0023-6438
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.lwt.2015.06.016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Vegetables are a class of plant foods that are eaten as fresh, canned, frozen and cooked vegetables. Beyond its effect on texture and taste, cooking also changes the nutritional properties of vegetables. Main phytochemicals such as vitamin C, folates (vitamin B9) and provitamin A carotenoids (β, α and γ-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin) are present in vegetables. Among non-vitaminic compounds, lutein ( Calvo, 2005 ) and lycopene ( Singh & Goyal, 2008 ) are also mostly provided in the diet by green leafy vegetables and tomato, respectively. Lutein plays a major role against macula degeneration ( Granado, Olmedilla, & Blanco, 2003 ), while lycopene has proven effects in prevention of prostate cancer ( Bramley, 2000 ).</P>The effect of domestic cooking on phytochemicals (carotenoids non-vitamin C, polyphenols, chlorophylls) and on micronutrients (vitamins) and has been already studied on vegetables ( Bernhardt & Schlich, 2006; Gebczynski & Lisiewska, 2006; Mazzeo et al., 2011; Miglio, Chiavaro, Visconti, Fogliano, & Pellegrini, 2008; Pellegrini et al., 2010; Sultana, Anwar, & Iqbal, 2008; Turkmen, Sari, & Velioglu, 2005; Volden, Borge, Hansen, Wicklund, & Bengtsson, 2009 ). Different procedures have been tested such as boiling, microwave cooking, steaming, pressure steaming, frying and stewing. Their effects

Journal

LWT - Food Science and TechnologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2015

References

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