Aquatic phototrophs: efficient alternatives to land-based crops for biofuels

Aquatic phototrophs: efficient alternatives to land-based crops for biofuels To mitigate some of the potentially deleterious environmental and agricultural consequences associated with current land-based-biofuel feedstocks, we propose the use of biofuels derived from aquatic microbial oxygenic photoautotrophs (AMOPs), more commonly known as cyanobacteria, algae, and diatoms. Herein we review their demonstrated productivity in mass culturing and aspects of their physiology that are particularly attractive for integration into renewable biofuel applications. Compared with terrestrial crops, AMOPs are inherently more efficient solar collectors, use less or no land, can be converted to liquid fuels using simpler technologies than cellulose, and offer secondary uses that fossil fuels do not provide. AMOPs pose a new set of technological challenges if they are to contribute as biofuel feedstocks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Biotechnology Elsevier

Aquatic phototrophs: efficient alternatives to land-based crops for biofuels

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0958-1669
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.copbio.2008.05.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To mitigate some of the potentially deleterious environmental and agricultural consequences associated with current land-based-biofuel feedstocks, we propose the use of biofuels derived from aquatic microbial oxygenic photoautotrophs (AMOPs), more commonly known as cyanobacteria, algae, and diatoms. Herein we review their demonstrated productivity in mass culturing and aspects of their physiology that are particularly attractive for integration into renewable biofuel applications. Compared with terrestrial crops, AMOPs are inherently more efficient solar collectors, use less or no land, can be converted to liquid fuels using simpler technologies than cellulose, and offer secondary uses that fossil fuels do not provide. AMOPs pose a new set of technological challenges if they are to contribute as biofuel feedstocks.

Journal

Current Opinion in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2008

References

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