Appreciation of localised task lighting in shift work—A field study in the food industry

Appreciation of localised task lighting in shift work—A field study in the food industry Localised task lighting was installed in addition to the general lighting installation in the food factory. Research has been carried out to test appreciation of this additional task lighting by workers working in fast-rotating shifts: viz. five shifts over the full year. There were between six and eight persons in one shift. Average age of workers was 42, most of whom were men. Employees’ opinions and performance was measured in three ways: repeated working environment and lighting questionnaires, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale questionnaires (KSS), and measurements of the time that employees needed to solve small operating problems at packaging machines. Questionnaire results showed that employees liked the new lighting. They felt that higher lighting levels made them feel less sleepy and able to perform better. Direct performance measurements showed on average a statistically significant 3 per cent improvement with the higher illuminance. This difference and its direction was not clear for all error types. The KSS measurements showed no significant effect of higher or lower illuminances. However, there was a significant pattern revealed by the KSS, namely that employees felt sleepy during the first and third breaks and sleepier during the second break and at the end of the working day. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Elsevier

Appreciation of localised task lighting in shift work—A field study in the food industry

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/appreciation-of-localised-task-lighting-in-shift-work-a-field-study-in-rbRrsOH6Rb
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0169-8141
eISSN
1872-8219
DOI
10.1016/j.ergon.2007.01.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Localised task lighting was installed in addition to the general lighting installation in the food factory. Research has been carried out to test appreciation of this additional task lighting by workers working in fast-rotating shifts: viz. five shifts over the full year. There were between six and eight persons in one shift. Average age of workers was 42, most of whom were men. Employees’ opinions and performance was measured in three ways: repeated working environment and lighting questionnaires, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale questionnaires (KSS), and measurements of the time that employees needed to solve small operating problems at packaging machines. Questionnaire results showed that employees liked the new lighting. They felt that higher lighting levels made them feel less sleepy and able to perform better. Direct performance measurements showed on average a statistically significant 3 per cent improvement with the higher illuminance. This difference and its direction was not clear for all error types. The KSS measurements showed no significant effect of higher or lower illuminances. However, there was a significant pattern revealed by the KSS, namely that employees felt sleepy during the first and third breaks and sleepier during the second break and at the end of the working day.

Journal

International Journal of Industrial ErgonomicsElsevier

Published: May 1, 2007

References

  • Bright light treatment used for adaptation to night work and re-adaptation back to day life. A field study at an oil platform in the North Sea
    Bjørvatn, B.; Kecklund, G.; Åkerstedt, T.
  • Dose–response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness
    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J.M.; Czeisler, C.A.; Dijk, D.J.
  • Speed and direction of shift rotation
    Knauth, P.
  • Suppression of sleepiness and melatonin by bright light exposure during breaks in night work
    Lowden, A.; Åkersted, T.; Wibom, R.
  • Sleep-wake rhythm in an irregular shift system
    Sallinen, M.; Härmä, M.; Mutanen, P.; Ranta, R.; Virkkala, J.; Muller, K.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off