Applying complexity theory to deepen service dominant logic: Configural analysis of customer experience-and-outcome assessments of professional services for personal transformations

Applying complexity theory to deepen service dominant logic: Configural analysis of customer... Introduction: complexity and customer evaluations of service enactments and outcomes</h5> Mann Zhang reports being very happy with his new metro-look outcome following his visit, haircut, and styling at Miao's Beauty Salon & Spa; Mann also reports that he intends not to return to Miao's shop in the future. A second customer, Lin Chu, reports that Miao's is dark and generally unattractive inside but she gives very positive ratings to Miao for overall service quality. The first of these two anecdotal stories is an example of a “negative contrarian case”—a specific case of a positive indicator and negative outcome relationship while most other cases support a positive main effect between an indicator and an outcome. The second anecdote is an example of a “positive contrarian case”—a specific case of a negative indicator and positive outcome while most cases support a negative main effect between the indicator (e.g., poor ambience) and the outcome (e.g., overall service quality).</P>The present article contributes a radically new perspective in the service dominant logic literature (SDL, e.g., Lusch & Vargo, 2006a, 2006b; Vargo & Lusch, 2004a, 2004b, 2006; Vargo & Morgan, 2005 ) in three principal ways. The study here explains how complexity theory provides http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business Research Elsevier

Applying complexity theory to deepen service dominant logic: Configural analysis of customer experience-and-outcome assessments of professional services for personal transformations

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0148-2963
eISSN
1873-7978
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jbusres.2014.03.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction: complexity and customer evaluations of service enactments and outcomes</h5> Mann Zhang reports being very happy with his new metro-look outcome following his visit, haircut, and styling at Miao's Beauty Salon & Spa; Mann also reports that he intends not to return to Miao's shop in the future. A second customer, Lin Chu, reports that Miao's is dark and generally unattractive inside but she gives very positive ratings to Miao for overall service quality. The first of these two anecdotal stories is an example of a “negative contrarian case”—a specific case of a positive indicator and negative outcome relationship while most other cases support a positive main effect between an indicator and an outcome. The second anecdote is an example of a “positive contrarian case”—a specific case of a negative indicator and positive outcome while most cases support a negative main effect between the indicator (e.g., poor ambience) and the outcome (e.g., overall service quality).</P>The present article contributes a radically new perspective in the service dominant logic literature (SDL, e.g., Lusch & Vargo, 2006a, 2006b; Vargo & Lusch, 2004a, 2004b, 2006; Vargo & Morgan, 2005 ) in three principal ways. The study here explains how complexity theory provides

Journal

Journal of Business ResearchElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2014

References

  • On the relationship between store image, store satisfaction and store loyalty
    Bloemer, J.; De Ruyter, K.
  • Configural algorithms of patient loyalty
    Chang, C.-W.; Tseng, T.-H.; Woodside, A.G.
  • Servicescape and loyalty intentions: An empirical investigation
    Harris, L.C.; Ezeh, C.
  • Re-conceptualizing consumer store image processing using perceived risk
    Mitchell, V.W.
  • The logic of scientific discovery
    Popper, K.
  • The effect of the servicescape on customers' behavioral intentions in leisure service settings
    Wakefield, K.; Blodgett, J.G.
  • Moving beyond multiple regression analysis to algorithms: Calling for a paradigm shift from symmetric to asymmetric thinking in data analysis, and crafting theory
    Woodside, A.G.

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