Application of geostatistics to evaluate partial weather station networks

Application of geostatistics to evaluate partial weather station networks Climatic data are an essential input for the determination of crop water requirements. The density and location of weather stations are the important design variables for obtaining the required degree of accuracy of weather data. The planning of weather station networks should include economic considerations, and a mixture of full and partial weather stations could be a cost-effective alternative. A ‘full’ weather station is defined here as one in which all the weather variables used in the modified Penman equation are measured, and a ‘partial’ weather station is one in which some, but not all, weather variables are measured. The accuracy of reference evapotranspiration ( Et r ) estimates for sites located some distance from surrounding stations is dependent on measurement error, error of the estimation equation, and interpolation error. The interpolation error is affected by the spatial correlation structure of weather variables and method of interpolation. A case-study data set of 2 years of daily climatic data (1989–1990) from 17 stations in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Colorado was used to compare alternative network designs and interpolation methods. Root mean squared interpolation error (RMSIE) values were the criteria for evaluating Et r estimates and network performance. The kriging method gave the lowest RMSIE, followed by the inverse distance square method and the inverse distance method. Co-kriging improved the estimates still further. For a given level of performance, a mixture of full and partial weather stations would be more economical than full stations only. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Elsevier

Application of geostatistics to evaluate partial weather station networks

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0168-1923
DOI
10.1016/S0168-1923(96)02358-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Climatic data are an essential input for the determination of crop water requirements. The density and location of weather stations are the important design variables for obtaining the required degree of accuracy of weather data. The planning of weather station networks should include economic considerations, and a mixture of full and partial weather stations could be a cost-effective alternative. A ‘full’ weather station is defined here as one in which all the weather variables used in the modified Penman equation are measured, and a ‘partial’ weather station is one in which some, but not all, weather variables are measured. The accuracy of reference evapotranspiration ( Et r ) estimates for sites located some distance from surrounding stations is dependent on measurement error, error of the estimation equation, and interpolation error. The interpolation error is affected by the spatial correlation structure of weather variables and method of interpolation. A case-study data set of 2 years of daily climatic data (1989–1990) from 17 stations in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Colorado was used to compare alternative network designs and interpolation methods. Root mean squared interpolation error (RMSIE) values were the criteria for evaluating Et r estimates and network performance. The kriging method gave the lowest RMSIE, followed by the inverse distance square method and the inverse distance method. Co-kriging improved the estimates still further. For a given level of performance, a mixture of full and partial weather stations would be more economical than full stations only.

Journal

Agricultural and Forest MeteorologyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 1997

References

  • A comparative analysis of techniques for spatial interpolation of precipitation
    Tabios, G.Q.; Sales, J.D.

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