Anxiolytic-like effect induced by chronic stress is reversed by naloxone pretreatment

Anxiolytic-like effect induced by chronic stress is reversed by naloxone pretreatment The present study assesses the influence of different restraint schedules on behavioral parameters determined by a conflict test, namely the light-dark transitions (LDT) as well as the opiate modulation on the behavioral consequences induced by chronic restraint. Finally, another group of animals that received naloxone (NAL) and/or chronic stress was either exposed to a single foot shock session or administered a single dose of the β-carboline FG 7142 ( N ′-methyl-β-carboline-3-carboxamide) immediately prior to the LDT test. We observed that a single restraint session (2 h) induced a decrease of LOT and time spent in the lit box, while chronic restraint (2 h per day for up to 7 days) induced a significant increase in both parameters. However, this increasing effect was blocked by a NAL administration (2 mg/kg IP) prior to each of the seven restraint events. A single foot shock or FG administration produced a clear anxiogenic response, an effect that was absent in animals previously submitted to chronic stress. In addition, NAL pretreatment abolished the chronic stress-induced attenuating effect on the behavioral suppression induced after either foot shock or FG administration. Therefore, these findings demonstrate that a previous history of chronic stress, leading to adaptation, induced an anxiolytic-like effect, and attenuated the behavioral supresslon produced by acute stressors. There seems to be an endogenous opiate mechanism involved in the behavioral influence induced by chronic stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Bulletin Elsevier

Anxiolytic-like effect induced by chronic stress is reversed by naloxone pretreatment

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/anxiolytic-like-effect-induced-by-chronic-stress-is-reversed-by-IsYcTOghwT
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0361-9230
eISSN
1873-2747
DOI
10.1016/0361-9230(94)00185-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study assesses the influence of different restraint schedules on behavioral parameters determined by a conflict test, namely the light-dark transitions (LDT) as well as the opiate modulation on the behavioral consequences induced by chronic restraint. Finally, another group of animals that received naloxone (NAL) and/or chronic stress was either exposed to a single foot shock session or administered a single dose of the β-carboline FG 7142 ( N ′-methyl-β-carboline-3-carboxamide) immediately prior to the LDT test. We observed that a single restraint session (2 h) induced a decrease of LOT and time spent in the lit box, while chronic restraint (2 h per day for up to 7 days) induced a significant increase in both parameters. However, this increasing effect was blocked by a NAL administration (2 mg/kg IP) prior to each of the seven restraint events. A single foot shock or FG administration produced a clear anxiogenic response, an effect that was absent in animals previously submitted to chronic stress. In addition, NAL pretreatment abolished the chronic stress-induced attenuating effect on the behavioral suppression induced after either foot shock or FG administration. Therefore, these findings demonstrate that a previous history of chronic stress, leading to adaptation, induced an anxiolytic-like effect, and attenuated the behavioral supresslon produced by acute stressors. There seems to be an endogenous opiate mechanism involved in the behavioral influence induced by chronic stress.

Journal

Brain Research BulletinElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • Effects of 8-OH-DPAT, buspirone and ICS 205–930 on feeding in a novel environment: Comparisons with chlordiazepoxide and FG 7142
    Fletcher, P.J.; Davies, M.
  • Changes in central GABAergic function following acute and repeated stress
    Otero Losada, M.E.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off